The Rocket Flame

Happy Homecoming

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Dancing Through the Decades

A Jamboree to the End of the School Year.

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A Jamboree to the End of the School Year.

Playing some jenga, Sadie Garbinski (9), Ashley Alfree (9), Colby Starr (10), and Kaanan Hissong (10) work to not knock down the stack.

Playing some jenga, Sadie Garbinski (9), Ashley Alfree (9), Colby Starr (10), and Kaanan Hissong (10) work to not knock down the stack.

Playing some jenga, Sadie Garbinski (9), Ashley Alfree (9), Colby Starr (10), and Kaanan Hissong (10) work to not knock down the stack.

Playing some jenga, Sadie Garbinski (9), Ashley Alfree (9), Colby Starr (10), and Kaanan Hissong (10) work to not knock down the stack.

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14 Things To Get Your Mom For Mother’s Day

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14 Things To Get Your Mom For Mother’s Day

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All throughout your life, your mother has been there to clean your dirty dishes, put away your laundry, and cook up meals for your rumbling stomach. From your perspective, these tasks may just look small and like they do not take a lot of time, but little do you know, these tasks are just small pieces of a bigger puzzle. In reality, mothers do many things for the well being of their children and on a Sunday in every May, we celebrate and appreciate their time and effort. This year, Mother’s Day falls on May 11.

 

Most of the time, acts of appreciation that mothers desire are small, but they want to know that their children truly love and appreciate the things they do for them.

 

“On Mother’s Day, honestly, I just want to be with the kids and spend the day enjoying them, not having to worry about cooking or any of that,” said Mrs. Stacey Deiseroth (Faculty).

 

If you are stuck on what to get your mom for Mother’s Day, here are 14 simple gifts to show how much you love her.

 

At the end of the day, all moms just simply want to be appreciated and loved for all the things they do for their families even if it is just for one day. Getting your mother any of these gifts will certainly be the height of her Mother’s Day.

2019 Special Olympics

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2019 Special Olympics

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On May 1 2019, the James Buchanan High school hosted their own Special Olympics. Taking place at the rocket stadium, schools in the Tuscarora school district bussed their kids to the stadium early Wednesday morning.  With a total of 42 participants; 19 high school participants, 9 Middle School, and 14 elementary school students. Each student competed at 3 events; softball throw, track race, and the long jump. Each school was put into different teams which competed against each other in the different events. Every participant was given 3 tries to get a better distance/score, when the participant finished they were given a popsicle stick telling them what place they received. All the students were happy as they showed off their multiple ribbons to the volunteers as well as their own parents who were welcome to attend the event. The day was filled with lots of cheering and encouragement as students had a chance to come out of their shell and express themselves.

Stay Busy Over Summer

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Stay Busy Over Summer

Sarah Kimmel (11) monitors  the pool, while on her lifeguarding duty.

Sarah Kimmel (11) monitors the pool, while on her lifeguarding duty.

Sarah Kimmel (11) monitors the pool, while on her lifeguarding duty.

Sarah Kimmel (11) monitors the pool, while on her lifeguarding duty.

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As the school year is coming to an end, summer is quickly approaching.  Beginning in less than a month, many students are starting to make summer plans and figure out what they are going to do on their break.  Many students are considering summer jobs. If you are one of those people who doesn’t know where to start, here are some ideas on local summer jobs.

 

Camp Counselor

A camp counselor will take on many adventures while supervising children of all age groups.  Counselors are leaders and role models for all of the children within their camp. So keep in mind these main skills you will need to be a counselor: you should like kids, have patience, good communication, and problem-solving skills.  This is a perfect job for people that think they may want to work with children or go into education. If you think camp counseling is the job for you, some local camps are Cove Valley, Camp Joy El, Whitetail Adventure Camp, and Mercersburg Academy Adventure Camp.

 

Restaurant Work

There are many areas in a restaurant that high school students can fill: a host/hostess, waitress/waiter, busser, or dishwasher.  Usually, the host duties include greeting guest and escorting the guest to their tables. As a waitress your job includes taking orders from guests, answering guest questions, and delivering food and beverages.  Busser duties include cleaning off the tables once the guest leaves the restaurant and taking the dishes back to the dishwasher.  The dishwasher’s duty is to clean and put away dishes. Working in a restaurant helps give students valuable communication skills.

“My favorite part of work is the connections I make with my co-workers and the free ice cream I get as a benefit,” said Breanna Dukehart (12) who works at Lizzy’s Ice Cream & Sandwich Shop as a cashier.

 

Grocery Work

Elena McNulty (11), Shayla Starliper, Veronica Lemus (12), Brenna Hartman (11), and Owen Monninger (12), and Adam Lippy pose for a picture at Food Lion.

As a stocker at a grocery store, your job would be to stack and organize items on shelves.  A stocker may also work as a cashier for the day, scanning and packaging items. As a cashier, you must possess quick simple math skills to give back correct change. You must also have good communication skills when working with customers.

“I would recommend this line of work to anyone because they are very flexible, have good pay, and it’s easy work,” said Owen Monninger (12).

Sarah Kimmel (11) monitors the pool, while on her lifeguarding duty.

 

Lifeguard

Lifeguards have a very serious job monitoring water while keeping people safe and happy.  To be a lifeguard you must be CPR- and AED-certified. As a lifeguard, you gain a lot of responsibility and become a very trusted person.  Lifeguards are depended on to ensure the safety of children and adults at the pool.

“I have learned that confrontation is something that you have to do no matter what even if you don’t want to hurt little kids feelings,” said Sarah Kimmel (11).  

The responsibility involved with lifeguarding means that they must put the safety of others above everything else, even if that means they can’t always be the nice guy.  This is a valuable life lesson because in life everyone isn’t always going to be pleased.

 

Farm Work

Another popular line of work around this area is farming.  Many high school students learn hard work and responsibility working on a farm over the summer.  Students can do anything from milking to bailing hay during their summer job on a farm. Work could start up to as early as three A.M., so this teaches many students the discipline of getting themselves up and ready on time to milk.

Now that you have some of the most common jobs for high school students, think about which one fits you. Get out there and apply so you can stay busy and get some money during your summer break.                                                                                                   

Roses Are Red, Violets Are Blue, I’d Like To Go To Prom With You

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Roses Are Red, Violets Are Blue, I’d Like To Go To Prom With You

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What do marriages and proms have in common? Proposals! Or rather, “promposals” for high school juniors and seniors.

Writing out your ideas can help you eliminate ones you don’t like as much.

Couples and friends use promposals to ask each other to prom. If you don’t have your prom date yet, here are a few tips from students that have already “promposed” to their dates.

“To plan my promposal, I just sort of talked to my friends,” said Dylan Poffenberger (11). “I asked them what they thought I should do.”

Dylan Poffenberger (11) uses a letter to ask Allison Collings (12) to prom.

It doesn’t have to be just up to you. Use other friends as a resource to help come up with ideas. When brainstorming a way to ask his date to prom, Poffenberger and his friends came up with a promposal using the song “Please, Mr. Postman” by the Marvelettes.

“I used a satchel,” Poffenberger said, acting as the postman who brought a letter that asked his date to prom. “I had to borrow it from one of my friends.”

In addition to asking friends for ideas, it pays to ask friends to help with the promposal itself. Poffenberger borrowed a mail satchel from a friend, and Jackie Wagaman (12) got some help from the clarinet section when she asked Michael Newman (12) to prom.

“Michael hinted that we should go to prom together, but the elephant in the room was the promposal,” said Wagaman. “So, being the non-traditional lady that I am, I promposed to him, because I’m a giving person and I like planning things like that for my friends.”

Wagaman gifted Newman a bag of coffee in the promposal, as she knew that Newman liked to drink coffee. Poffenberger knew that his date, Allison Collings (12), also liked cuties oranges, so he got her a bag to go along with his promposal.

Ashley Alfree (9), Kennedy Sauders (9), Sadie Garbinski (9), and Hailey Embree (10) spell out “Prom” for Jackie Wagaman (12) as she asks Michael Newman (12) to prom.

“Make sure that [your promposal] is cute and the person that you’re asking will like it,” Poffenberger said.

Making sure that your date will like their promposal is one of the most important parts, as well as making sure that it’s sincere. Poffenberger also advised having the promposal be something that’s special to the person that you’re asking. The promposal doesn’t have to be one that’s in the middle of the cafeteria during lunch, with balloons and posters. It can be simple and straightforward, as simple as just writing “prom?” on a cup of coffee.

“Sometimes, less is best,” Wagaman said. “Focus on the moment and the person.”

Wagaman also said that by making the moment special and memorable for your date, it will make it memorable for you in turn.

Nick Alfree (11) utilizes a flag to ask his date to prom at the Indoor Color Guard championships.

“I would say just make sure you think about it, but don’t think about it too much,” said Poffenberger.

The basic tips of planning a promposal? Brainstorm with your friends; put your heads together because you’ll be bound to get an idea that works. Make sure that it’s special and memorable for the person you want to ask, and then it’ll be special for you as well. Prompose to them in a way that they’ll appreciate. You don’t want to embarrass them by having a large, public promposal planned if they’d rather have something small and quiet. Finally, don’t stress if it doesn’t turn out perfect; it’s the little quirks and flaws that make moments memorable.

 

James Buchanan Indoor Guard

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James Buchanan Indoor Guard

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James Buchanan Indoor Guard

 

Reaching Past Teaching

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Reaching Past Teaching

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Reaching Past Teaching

Teachers Take on Bucket Lists

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Teachers Take on Bucket Lists

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Do you have a list of all the things you want to do in your life before a certain time? Bucket Lists are activities or goals you want to achieve before the end of a certain time. Many high school students make a bucket list with an abundance of activities.

Someone who might have an opinion or advice on a bucket list could be teachers since they have had more experiences than the students. Some teachers create or still have bucket lists of their own.

“I think it gives the students a goal, something to reach for. Maybe they will look to put themselves to get there one day and become goal-oriented,” said Mrs. Megan Swailes (Faculty).

Morgan Shughart (10) works on her bucket list

 

With bucket lists, students can think of many things and goals they want to achieve in the future. Bucket lists can be something students look forward to doing and completing.

“It can be beneficial if they put time and effort into it,” said Mr. Robert Harvey (Faculty).

Putting time and effort into a bucket list can teach you to do the same with other things. It is a way for students to learn how to strive and accomplish tasks.

“It gives everyone a motive and something to look forward to doing while making goals,” said Caleb Wise (10)

 

Holding up the bucket lists they created, Jacob Richard (10), Hunter Smith (10), Kaden Ramsey (10), and Lucas Richard (10) compare theirs.

Bucket lists affect students giving them a passion for things. It gives them hope and accomplishments if you complete what you’re striving to do.

 

Students are surrounded by teachers and faculty every day, so students should turn to the faculty for advice. Whether it be skydiving or spending a night in a hotel facing the Eiffel Tower, your teachers know what’s important and attainable for you. Don’t be afraid to ask someone on how to achieve the best version of your own bucket list, so that you can live your life to the fullest. 

 

Teens, A Life-Threatening Disease, and Love

Movie Review: 'Five Feet Apart'

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Teens, A Life-Threatening Disease, and Love

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  A romance is flourishing in the hospital wing of two teenagers with cystic fibrosis. Directed by Justin Baldoni, the tear jerking movie features a girl named Stella (Haley Lu Richardson) who has hope for extending her life expectancy. She is an on-task, orderly, bright young girl who seems to have her life and her med cart put together.  On the other hand, a rebellious boy Will (Cole Sprouse) is not too keen on his treatments, is the complete opposite of Stella, an artistic, insurgent with a bad-tempered attitude. Will he change his act for a love that is expanding?


  With emotion, comes tears. The actors did a phenomenal job expressing emotion throughout the film. They built up the intensity to the perfect point then let it drop into a cascade of tears. In the movie theater, I could hear the whimpering and the cries from the teenage girls around me.

  Enchantment was amongst the two cystic fibrosis patients with a desire for love without touch. The display of affection towards each other played a key role in this film. This may have been challenging considering neither of them may touch due to fear they can get each other sick to the point of death. They wrote notes, Facetimed, and compiled drawings to display their desire towards each other.

  Cole Sprouse and Haley Lu Richardson exhibited congruity with their characters. They were a match made in heaven for this film! The couple together showed desire and passion as if it was real. In films, they show desire towards one another through a touch or a perhaps a kiss. Showing great strength of their relationship through talks, drawings, and a pool stick to separate them.

  The movie as a whole represented the struggles of a person with cystic fibrosis. The love, heartaches, and endless long days and nights spent within the hospital to find a treatment that works to extend or cure the longevity of their life. It also teaches you to the live every moment like its your last to take that chance such as taking that one foot to stand five feet apart instead of six. “I live to take the medicine,” said Stella. “I need to take the medicine to live.” I gave this movie a overall 3 out of 5 stars due to the movie lacking of relatability to the characters and some scenes from the movie are portrayed less than reality.

 

 

 

Every Mile is a Memory

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Singing, Dancing, and Vanilla Ice Cream – Oh My!

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Singing, Dancing, and Vanilla Ice Cream – Oh My!

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