The Rocket Flame

Concerns Regarding Montgomery Elementary

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Within the rural area of Southern Pennsylvania, Tuscarora School District contains six schools: four elementary schools, a middle school, and a high school. Each elementary school has zoning boundaries to assign where each student will attend elementary school  in the district, and one of these schools is not getting as many students compared to the other three schools.

 

Montgomery Elementary School is having a predicament with enrollment numbers within the community. In order to solve this problem, Superintendent Rodney Benedick and the TSD Board of Directors have been gathering data. 

 

“There was an enrollment study from March of 2018: our enrollment is shrinking substantially, and, from this study, it’s supposed to shrink for the next 10 years,” said Benedick.

 

Other than the enrollment of the school, some decisions were being processed from many board meetings, committee meetings,and also public meetings about this topic. 

 

“The decision process has been deferred. We could be a year or more from actual decisions deep into this point,” said Benedick.  “The Board feels like they haven’t had time or input to make a decision yet.”

 

With all of the discussions and meetings, the Board wanted to announce this topic to the public to see what people might think of this.

 

“We had five different public sessions about this topic, we did School Reaches and put it in the paper, and not a lot of people paid attention to the early part of it, until the option phases came out, that’s when people really got involved in it because it becomes real by that point,” Benedick said. 

 

Another thing that we had to talk about was the pros and cons about this decision. This was important because people can have a plan on what would happen if Montgomery were to shut down.

 

“The pros would be to even out class sizes in our elementary schools said Benedick. ”The cons are nobody likes change, no one likes to have schools close.”

 

It’s a controversial topic because it impacts the community and the education of students.

 

“It’s a combined effort of the Board and the community to make the recommendation for what is right for our kids,” Benedick said.

Puerto Rican Paradise

Back to Article
Back to Article

Puerto Rican Paradise

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






After two years of planning, a group of 16 students were ready to begin their six-day journey in Puerto Rico that included snorkeling, hiking, ziplining, touring the capitol, kayaking in a bioluminescent bay, and eating lots of beans.

This was the first trip Ms. Danielle Simchick (Faculty) organized and planned on her own with her students. Ms. Danielle Fox (Faculty) and Mrs. Marie Donahoe (Faculty) accompanied her. Sign-ups began in the Fall of 2017, where 16 students decided to participate in this experience. With two years of planning and fundraising, June 18, 2019 was the day the group of students and faculty would start their travels after saying goodbye to their families and boarding a bus to BWI. 

To prepare for this big trip, students made lots of packing lists and learned about all the places they would be visiting. It is crucial to know the background of all the places that they were visiting.

“It was a little nerve-racking at first, but then after the first day everybody got really comfortable,” said Simchick. 

After the group made it to the airport, they made their way to the plane for the four-hour flight straight to San Juan, Puerto Rico. 

“The flight was really fun,” said Colby Starr. “It was some of our first time on a plane together.”

After landing, they were picked up by their tour guide on a bus after claiming all their baggage. The students started to experience the hot and humid weather of Puerto Rico, so they stopped at a local beach near the airport and enjoyed a couple of hours in the water before heading to the hotel.

The first full day of Puerto Rico was mostly all on foot. The first stop of the day was zip

lining and hiking. The rest of the day consisted of the students touring San Juan with a tour guide. 

All of the faculty and students gather together for a picture in front of the La Fortaleza in San Juan.

Three more groups accompanied JB on this trip: groups from Kansas, Virgina, and Wisconsin, which made a full bus. Between sightseeing and other activities, the students spent a lot of time getting to know the other groups. 

“My favorite part about the trip was snorkeling,” said Starr (11).

The next day was dedicated to riding a boat out to a small island off the coast of Puerto Rico. Students spent their time swimming, paddleboarding, and eating lots of food. After some time, a tour guide took all the students out farther in the ocean to snorkel. Most students said was their favorite part was seeing the sea turtles, stingrays, and puffer fish. 

Later that night, on the way home the last stop of the night was to a bioluminescent bay in Vieques. A bioluminescent bay is a bay that has tiny organisms that will light up at night, causing the water to turn bright blue, and students were able to kayak through it.

 

While touring San Juan, the group takes a picture at one of the pit stops.

After all the water and hiking days, the rest of the trip was spent touring Puerto Rico in San Juan and Ponce. The last day was traveling to Ponce and staying in a new hotel for the night. 

“This experience taught the students how to travel, how to navigate through an airport, how to be on time, how to pack, how to speak and practice Spanish, and most importantly how to be flexible and go with the flow,” said Simchick. 

Even though there was a set schedule, the students learned how to be open to things changing, as well. 

Once the time came on the sixth day, everyone got up and did a little more touring before getting on the bus to head home. Their flight home was a layover, so their first stop was in Orlando for a couple hours before they would make it to BWI. By that time, the students were anxious to be back home and in Mercersburg. 

Late that night after making it to the airport and onto the bus home, the students arrived in the middle of the night with welcoming friends and families waiting upon their arrival. 

With lots of pictures and new friendships, the students will always remember this experience and all hope to do it again with Simchick next year.

Science Days

The+ap+chemistry+class+poses+for+a+picture+on+the+playground+at+St.+Thomas+Elementary.+Carlee+Jackson+%2811%29%2C+Tanner+Myers+%2811%29%2C+Jordan+Harbold+%2811%29%2C+Alyssa+Blair+%2812%29%2C+Daniel+Corcoran+%2812%29%2C+Trenton+Morgan+%2812%29%2C+Amanda+Sensinger+%2811%29%2C+Dale+MIller+%2812%29%2C+Mackenzie+Saunders+%2811%29%2C+Alyssa+Velasquez-Glant+%2812%29%2C+Kayla+Noll-Bader+%2812%29%2C+Ella+Jones+%2812%29%2C+and+Abby+Carbaugh+%2812%29
Back to Article
Back to Article

Science Days

The ap chemistry class poses for a picture on the playground at St. Thomas Elementary. Carlee Jackson (11), Tanner Myers (11), Jordan Harbold (11), Alyssa Blair (12), Daniel Corcoran (12), Trenton Morgan (12), Amanda Sensinger (11), Dale MIller (12), Mackenzie Saunders (11), Alyssa Velasquez-Glant (12), Kayla Noll-Bader (12), Ella Jones (12), and Abby Carbaugh (12)

The ap chemistry class poses for a picture on the playground at St. Thomas Elementary. Carlee Jackson (11), Tanner Myers (11), Jordan Harbold (11), Alyssa Blair (12), Daniel Corcoran (12), Trenton Morgan (12), Amanda Sensinger (11), Dale MIller (12), Mackenzie Saunders (11), Alyssa Velasquez-Glant (12), Kayla Noll-Bader (12), Ella Jones (12), and Abby Carbaugh (12)

The ap chemistry class poses for a picture on the playground at St. Thomas Elementary. Carlee Jackson (11), Tanner Myers (11), Jordan Harbold (11), Alyssa Blair (12), Daniel Corcoran (12), Trenton Morgan (12), Amanda Sensinger (11), Dale MIller (12), Mackenzie Saunders (11), Alyssa Velasquez-Glant (12), Kayla Noll-Bader (12), Ella Jones (12), and Abby Carbaugh (12)

The ap chemistry class poses for a picture on the playground at St. Thomas Elementary. Carlee Jackson (11), Tanner Myers (11), Jordan Harbold (11), Alyssa Blair (12), Daniel Corcoran (12), Trenton Morgan (12), Amanda Sensinger (11), Dale MIller (12), Mackenzie Saunders (11), Alyssa Velasquez-Glant (12), Kayla Noll-Bader (12), Ella Jones (12), and Abby Carbaugh (12)

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






The ap chemistry class poses for a picture on the playground at St. Thomas Elementary. Carlee Jackson (11), Tanner Myers (11), Jordan Harbold (11), Alyssa Blair (12), Daniel Corcoran (12), Trenton Morgan (12), Amanda Sensinger (11), Dale Miller (12), Mackenzie Saunders (11), Alyssa Velasquez-Glant (12), Kayla Noll-Bader (12), Ella Jones (12), and Abby Carbaugh (12)

On May 16 and 17, The AP Chemistry class at James Buchanan High School went to TSD Elementary schools for a Science Days.  During Science Days, the Chem class walked the elementary students through two experiments to get them excited about science.  After the experiments JBHS students related what they did to a real-life problem and showed how scientists solve problems. On Thursday the students went to St. Thomas and Mt. View and on Friday they went to Mercersburg and Montgomery.  

The project was first introduced by the high schools Chemistry teacher, Mrs. Rebecca Miller (Faculty).  She has been taking her AP Chemistry classes to the elementary schools for a little over ten years.

“I think we had a very successful day,”  said Noah Wise (12). “My favorite part was how excited all the little kids got when learning about science.”

Miller got the experiment ideas this year from the teacher’s science convention. During the Toothpaste Challenge, the students had to empty out a bottle of toothpaste and used their problem solving skills to see how much they could get back into the bottle.  

Hunter Gayman (2) and Chloe Shew (2) work together to get toothpaste back into the bottle during Elementary Science Day.

“The toothpaste lab was my favorite to do with the children because it was fun to see them use their imagination to come up with different ideas to get the toothpaste back into the bottle,” said Daniel Corcoran (12).

This was supposed to replicate when scientists have to quickly clean-up spills that can be harmful to the earth, people, or animals.  

The Copycat Challenge was used to show students how scientist are copycats sometimes when it comes to making new inventions.  An example given to the kids was how scientists got the idea of airplanes from animals like birds, butterflies, and bees.

“The copycat lab was my favorite to do with the kids because we had to remember the color wheel and experiment which colors would  show a desired color,” said Owen Stoner (12).

The challenge consisted of the children mixing different food coloring colors to mimic the color of soda.

Colton Pine (2) and Trey Shandle (2) work together to complete the Copycat Challenge on Elementary Science Day.

After the experiments were complete, the students had time to discuss how they were related to science.  They also had the opportunity to ask the high school students any questions they had about high school.

“It was really fun when the students asked us about high school,” said Corcoran. “We were asked questions from “ Is the lunch at the high school good?” to “ What are your plans after high school?”

In the future, Miller has hopes of expanding and continuing the project. Whether it be going to more grade levels or going to the middle school too.  The elementary science days have an impact on the younger kids and can be very memorable throughout the kids educational career.

Spring Has Sprung At One North Coffee Shop

Back to Article
Back to Article

Spring Has Sprung At One North Coffee Shop

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Spring has sprung! One North Coffee Shop in Mercersburg, PA welcomes spring with a pop-up shop of decadent treats ranging from cupcakes to brownies to cakes. Flowers galore of all colors were present, as well as jewelry to spruce up colorful outfits to welcome the warm weather. The spring atmosphere was alive and well at One North Coffee Shop.

Roses Are Red, Violets Are Blue, I’d Like To Go To Prom With You

Back to Article
Back to Article

Roses Are Red, Violets Are Blue, I’d Like To Go To Prom With You

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






What do marriages and proms have in common? Proposals! Or rather, “promposals” for high school juniors and seniors.

Writing out your ideas can help you eliminate ones you don’t like as much.

Couples and friends use promposals to ask each other to prom. If you don’t have your prom date yet, here are a few tips from students that have already “promposed” to their dates.

“To plan my promposal, I just sort of talked to my friends,” said Dylan Poffenberger (11). “I asked them what they thought I should do.”

Dylan Poffenberger (11) uses a letter to ask Allison Collings (12) to prom.

It doesn’t have to be just up to you. Use other friends as a resource to help come up with ideas. When brainstorming a way to ask his date to prom, Poffenberger and his friends came up with a promposal using the song “Please, Mr. Postman” by the Marvelettes.

“I used a satchel,” Poffenberger said, acting as the postman who brought a letter that asked his date to prom. “I had to borrow it from one of my friends.”

In addition to asking friends for ideas, it pays to ask friends to help with the promposal itself. Poffenberger borrowed a mail satchel from a friend, and Jackie Wagaman (12) got some help from the clarinet section when she asked Michael Newman (12) to prom.

“Michael hinted that we should go to prom together, but the elephant in the room was the promposal,” said Wagaman. “So, being the non-traditional lady that I am, I promposed to him, because I’m a giving person and I like planning things like that for my friends.”

Wagaman gifted Newman a bag of coffee in the promposal, as she knew that Newman liked to drink coffee. Poffenberger knew that his date, Allison Collings (12), also liked cuties oranges, so he got her a bag to go along with his promposal.

Ashley Alfree (9), Kennedy Sauders (9), Sadie Garbinski (9), and Hailey Embree (10) spell out “Prom” for Jackie Wagaman (12) as she asks Michael Newman (12) to prom.

“Make sure that [your promposal] is cute and the person that you’re asking will like it,” Poffenberger said.

Making sure that your date will like their promposal is one of the most important parts, as well as making sure that it’s sincere. Poffenberger also advised having the promposal be something that’s special to the person that you’re asking. The promposal doesn’t have to be one that’s in the middle of the cafeteria during lunch, with balloons and posters. It can be simple and straightforward, as simple as just writing “prom?” on a cup of coffee.

“Sometimes, less is best,” Wagaman said. “Focus on the moment and the person.”

Wagaman also said that by making the moment special and memorable for your date, it will make it memorable for you in turn.

Nick Alfree (11) utilizes a flag to ask his date to prom at the Indoor Color Guard championships.

“I would say just make sure you think about it, but don’t think about it too much,” said Poffenberger.

The basic tips of planning a promposal? Brainstorm with your friends; put your heads together because you’ll be bound to get an idea that works. Make sure that it’s special and memorable for the person you want to ask, and then it’ll be special for you as well. Prompose to them in a way that they’ll appreciate. You don’t want to embarrass them by having a large, public promposal planned if they’d rather have something small and quiet. Finally, don’t stress if it doesn’t turn out perfect; it’s the little quirks and flaws that make moments memorable.

 

Helping The Community Around Them

Back to Article
Back to Article

Helping The Community Around Them

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






  On Thursday April 11, the James Buchanan National Honor Society (NHS took a trip to Cove Valley Christian Camp to help spruce up their camp to get it ready for the upcoming summer.  The work day at Cove Valley marked the first time that the new inductees worked alongside the old inductees to accomplish a clean-up day for the camp.

The shed needing a new coat of paint, Cassidy Martin (12) and new inductee, Cierra Hartman (11) take on the daring task.

  Throughout the day NHS members had several different tasks to accomplish around the camp. A second-year member of the club, Emily Palmerchuck (12), volunteered to help her fellow members split and stack wood for the camp. This was her last time volunteering for NHS.

  “It’s really fulfilling I would say, but it’s also really sad because we were working with a lot of the same students from last year, and we’re just getting to know the new recruits”said Emily Palmerchuck. “It’s really sad that we’re not gonna be able to work with them anymore.”

  The veteran members of the club will be stepping down to graduate on May 31, 2019  and the new members will step up to take the place of the seniors to guide the club into the future.

  “I think they have really started to step up quickly,” said Emily Palmerchuck. “I know some groups in the past have just been a part of it, these new inductees are really putting forth the effort, and you can tell they care about the organization.”

  By shedding some light onto what it’s like to help the community around them, the junior members demonstrate leadership qualities.

  Claire Kriner (11) , a new inductee, volunteered her time at Cove Valley to pick up logs that have been split for firewood.

  “It felt really good,” said Kriner. “It’s hard to believe if we didn’t come today, all the people that were there that helped out at the camp would have had to do it, and that was a lot of work.”

Helping pick up logs to be split into firewood is Kristen Louder (12) helping along are her teammates.

  Splitting and stacking wood, painting the shed, picking up sticks, and raking the flower bed were the tasks for the members. The clean up was all possible with the help of the Cove Valley Christian Camp volunteers that guided them along throughout the day. As the senior members will graduate in May, the new inductees will continue this journey into their senior year by advancing their hours from their junior year to volunteer more around the community, as well as trying to make an impact within the school district.

Eliminating Fear With Steps of Hope

Back to Article
Back to Article

Eliminating Fear With Steps of Hope

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






In a small community, a large number of people are impacted by cancer. Whether it is themselves who are affected or the people around them, many lives are changed by the disease. To support the many people in our small town who have been challenged by the trials of cancer, the community gathered at the Mercersburg Academy on Feb. 17, 2019, from 1-7 P.M. to participate in the Relay for Life.

 

The Relay for Life is a fundraiser done in communities to benefit the American Cancer Society. The event should last

To start off Relay for Life, survivors and current fighters of cancer walked the first lap.

from 6-24 hours, and everyone is asked to walk laps around the track the whole time, signifying how cancer never sleeps.

 

Many people relay for personal reasons. The event allows them to have a time where they can share their experiences with people who have similar experiences.

 

“I relay for my grandma who is currently battling ovarian cancer and is hopefully in remission; my mom who had cervical cancer, and my brother’s dad who died from leukemia,” said Shaelyn Kaiser (12).

 

For other students, instead of walking, they preferred a behind the scenes approach with setting up relay.

 

“Our motivation was that most of our friends and family members were affected by cancer,” said Alexis Keith (12). “We just thought it was a good idea to raise money for them.”

 

Throughout Relay, there were many events that took place. Many of them were light-hearted, such as Zumba, Minute-

At Relay for Life, there were many activities throughout the event. During one lap, Seniors Shaelyn Kaiser, Olivia Harmon, Lindsay Ambrisco, Cass Martin, and Maggie Strawoet did Zumba.

to-Win-It, sending people to jail, and rounds were people born in each decade would take a lap. While there were fun events, there were also serious ones that led the focus to the real reason everyone was there: eliminating cancer.

 

The event opened with Mr. Doug Hoffman telling the crowd about his past experience with cancer, and his current experience. As the event continued, many people bought luminaries for their loved ones who have suffered or fallen to cancer. In the middle of the event, the Luminaria Ceremony began.

 

As the crowd stood in the dark, the speaker read a poem about cancer being like a birthday cake with twelve candles, each one representing a month that was spent without their loved one. As each month was read, a luminaria was lit. At the end of the speech, everyone was encouraged to go light their loved ones luminaria. After the room was lit up by the array of luminaries, the attendees took silent laps around the track in honor of all of the people afflicted by the deadly disease.

 

Relay inspired hope, but one of its purposes was to raise money to donate to cancer research. James Buchanan High School decided to raise money through a Mr. Relay Pageant, where the school’s boys went through comical pageant events.

 

“The pageant was our way to raise the money. We ended [up] raising a lot more than we expected to,” said Keith.

 

At the end of the Relay week, the pageant raised approximately $800 and the actual Relay for Life over $28,000, with donations still coming in, that was given to the American Cancer Society.

 

With many people being diagnosed and affected by cancer every day, our community took Relay for Life by the reigns and raised money to abolish the disease for once and for all.

$10, 621,683.76 Raised

Back to Article
Back to Article

$10, 621,683.76 Raised

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






The 6th Annual “Festival Of Lights”

Back to Article
Back to Article

The 6th Annual “Festival Of Lights”

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






A Merry Mercersburg Christmas

Back to Article
Back to Article

A Merry Mercersburg Christmas

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






It’s the beginning of the most wonderful time of the year, and the decorations around town show it. Wreaths are hanging off parking meters, the light poles are draped in garland, and local businesses adorn various ensembles of decorations. The staple of Mercersburg’s festive spirit is located in the square, and it stands tall with sparkling lights and ornaments: the Christmas tree.

On Nov. 24, the Tuscarora Area Chamber of Commerce held a Merry Mercersburg Tree Lighting from 4-7pm. Many

Celebrating their first birthday, One North gave out free cake to their customers in flavors vanilla, chocolate, and ginger.

businesses came together to generate a festive atmosphere.

A center of the evening’s events revolved around the local coffee shop, One North. The fairly new business celebrated

their first birthday on Nov. 24. To any customer who stopped by, there was a free slice of birthday cake. Also, there was free coffee and hot chocolate being offered outside to anyone attending the lighting. For the children, Christmas crafts were available in the shop.

For One North, this one-year journey has been full of a lot of changes and progress.

“The entire store has grown and improved very rapidly. Just recently we tore down a wall and put in a bakery case, literally overnight, to display our talented baker’s hard work and efforts,” said Logan Williams (12), who works at One North.

The coffee shop is still working on how to improve their business.  

Some businesses gave out free goodies during the Merry Mercersburg Tree Lighting. Shay Fisher (12) enjoys free milk and cookies from Agronomy Inc.

“I foresee us being open on Monday every week rather than being closed,” said Williams.  “People enjoy being there and want to spend as much time there as they can.”

While Christmas music played throughout the square, several vendors gathered to offer their goods up. Agronomy Inc. gave away free cookies and milk for people to munch on as they shopped around. Other businesses were also attending, such as Snider’s Elevator.

The Rocket Band was also a vendor, selling baked goods to raise money to give to the Music Boosters.

“We are here supporting the JB Music Boosters to help raise money for everything we need for our indoor program,” said Lauren Ramsey (10). “There’s a lot of things parents do to raise money that not a lot of people know about, so I like to come out and help with that.”

Raising money for the Music Boosters, Lauren Ramsey (10) and Hannah Hicks (7) sell baked goods.

The band had sold a lot of goods, as a lot of people turned out to show their support.

“There’s been a lot of people coming by, buying whole things (baked goods) and using them for parties and other things

like that,” said Ramsey.

At 6 o’clock, Mr. and Mrs. Santa Claus made an appearance. After riding in on a fire truck from Mercersburg Volunteer

Fire Department, they stopped by to take photos with kids and those young at heart.

The Mercersburg tree was lit at 6:30 pm on the square.

Then, at 6:30, the tree was lit. After a speech was given, the many people attending the lighting gathered around to countdown for the tree. This year’s tree was donated by M&T Bank and stands tall in front of the business on the square.

The last event of the night was held at the Star Theatre. It’s A Wonderful Life was played for free. Along with the movie, free popcorn, drinks, and candy were given out. The movie was sponsored by the Mercersburg Academy. The star of the Christmas classic, Jimmy Stewart, was a Mercersburg Academy graduate.

It’s just the end of November, but Christmas cheer is already being spread throughout Mercersburg. The lighting of the Christmas tree on Nov. 24 was not just that, but it was also an event filled with giving from local businesses and holiday festivities.

The Effect of Social Media Use on Teens

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Social media allows us to share ideas and creations with others, network, and be able to show expressions of our personality. With the current popular platforms teens have been using, they are able to form new relationships with others, share pictures that they took, and update people on their lives. While in theory social media is great place to partake in all of these activities, teens that are active on these sites can be at a greater risk for anxiety and depression.

 

The number of hours of screen time you are active on social media can affect your mental health.

 

An article posted in Clinical Psychological Science took a nationally represented survey of children in grades 8 to 12 and national suicide statistics from ages 13 to 18, and they found that children who are more active on social media were more likely to report their mental health concerns.

 

The number of social media sites you are on can also set you at a greater risk.

 

A study was published in Computers in Human Behavior that found the use of various social media sites is strongly associated with depression. This study concluded that teens who are on seven or more social media sites had a three times more likely risk of getting depression, and kids that are on two or less sites had a lesser risk.

 

When scrolling through social media, it causes teens to see “perfect” images that others post, causing them the pressure of wanting and feeling like they have to be like them. They feel pressure to have perfect photos and well-written posts like the posts they see, which can cause a great deal of anxiety. Girls are mainly susceptible to this due to them wanting to compare themselves to others to develop their identities.

 

A survey conducted in the UK in the Royal Society for Public Health asked kids ages 14-24 how social media platforms affected their mental health. The study concluded that social media platforms such as Snapchat, Facebook, and Instagram all led to increased feelings of depression, poor body image, and loneliness.

 

Whenever kids make friendships over social media, they can become too emotionally invested in them, and never get a chance to recollect themselves. Without a break you can get emotionally depleted, causing anxiety to appear more easily.

 

“Whatever we think of the ‘relationships’ maintained and in some cases initiated on social media, kids never get a break from them,” says Dr. Wick in the article How Using Social Media Affects Teenagers by Rachel Ehmke. Dr. Wick continues to say, “These days he might just disappear from your screen, and you never get to have the ‘What did I do?’ conversation.”

 

Due to being ignored, the “what did I do thought” will remain in their head, causing anxiety. This can lead to them thinking the worst about themselves which puts them at a greater risk for depression.

 

Social media not only can affect the way we think but can also affect the way we sleep.

 

Another study conducted in the UK published in the Journal of Youth Studies took 900 kids around 12-15 years old and surveyed them about their social media use. What they found was that one-fifth of the teens said they “almost always” wake up during the night and log in to social media. Kids need more sleep than adults, and with them waking up in the middle of the night to check their social media causes them to not get the sleep they need. This can be detrimental to their health, mentally and physically. The lack of sleep can make them more irritable, as well as lower their immune system causing them to be more susceptible to illness.

 

The human brain develops so much during the teenage years, and if you are constantly on social media, it can impact that growth. Being on these sites often can cause poor communication skills, lower your self esteem, and in the end, raise your stakes for being at risk for mental health concerns.

 

“Offline, the gold standard advice for helping kids build healthy self-esteem is to get them involved in something that they’re interested in,” says Sherri Gordon in the article, 5 Ways Social Media Affects Teen Mental Health.

If you get yourself involved in something you are interested in, it will boost your self esteem.

Sherri Gordon then continues to state, “When kids learn to feel good about what they can do instead of how they look and what they own, they’re happier and better prepared for success in real life.” This will help reduce their risk of feelings of anxiety and depression.

The History of the Armistice

Back to Article
Back to Article

The History of the Armistice

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






You’ve probably heard someone say, “It’s 11:11, make a wish!” The number 11 is supposed to be lucky. To the soldiers fighting in World War I, it was.

World War I began in 1914 following the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, the heir to the Austria-Hungarian throne, according to Robert Green’s book, World War I. Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia (where the assassins were from), and their allies were pulled into the fight. This began the Great War, initially only involving Eurasian countries.

The war raged on, involving more and more countries. The United States, under Woodrow Wilson’s presidency, chose to remain neutral for three years. They provided weapons, equipment, and other supplies to both sides of the war—the Allies and the Central Powers.

Following the sinking of a passenger ship, the RMS Lusitania, and the Zimmerman Telegram, citizens of the United States pushed Woodrow Wilson to join the war. He met with Congress to request a declaration of war. According to Stewart Ross’s book, World War I, Congress agreed on April 6, 1917. The United States was now involved in the war.

The United States joined the war opposing Austria-Hungary and Germany. The U.S. sided with the Allies, which included Great Britain, France, Serbia, Italy, and Russia (before they withdrew from the war).

A little over a year later, the Central Powers were starting to crumble. According to Green, the Austrians surrendered to the Italians, the Hungarians dissociated themselves from Austria, and the Allies moved in on Germany. The German army held strong, but Kaiser Wilhelm II didn’t.

On November 10, 1918, the last emperor of Germany fled to the Netherlands, according to Green. The remaining government of Germany met with the Allies the following day.

Ross, Stewart. World War I. World Almanac Library, 2005.

“At 11 a.m. on November 11, 1918, Germany and the Allies signed an armistice that brought all hostilities to an end,” Stewart Ross wrote in his book, World War I.

November 11 became known as Armistice Day and was celebrated as marking the end of the Great War. Peace conferences began in January of the following year, 1919. In these conferences, President Wilson proposed his Fourteen Points, which included an international peacekeeping organization, the League of Nations.

The terms of the Treaty of Versailles and other treaties signed following the end of World War I were humiliating for the losing side, according to Ross. These humiliating terms led to World War II twenty years later, where the United States was pulled into the war again once it was in full swing.

Wars that followed World War I included the second World War, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War, among others. Within these wars, many lives were lost. This is why Armistice Day would eventually become known as Veterans’ Day. It still falls on November 11, but now it serves as a day to remember soldiers that lost their lives in the wars, as well as men and women currently serving.

November 11, 2018 marks a hundred years since the signing of the armistice. Around the world, countries held events to honor the end of World War I and those that died fighting in it. In Washington D.C., there was a parade celebrating the hundred years that have passed since the Great War ended.

The signing of the armistice meant an end to bloody battles, where soldiers risked their lives living in muddy trenches. At 11 a.m. on November 11, the bloody battles ceased. The soldiers could leave the war behind, returning to being civilians instead. Maybe the end to the war was their 11:11 wish.

 

Navigate Left
  • Concerns Regarding Montgomery Elementary

    Entertainment

    Puerto Rican Paradise

  • Concerns Regarding Montgomery Elementary

    Off Campus

    Science Days

  • Concerns Regarding Montgomery Elementary

    Off Campus

    Spring Has Sprung At One North Coffee Shop

  • Concerns Regarding Montgomery Elementary

    Entertainment

    Roses Are Red, Violets Are Blue, I’d Like To Go To Prom With You

  • Concerns Regarding Montgomery Elementary

    Off Campus

    Helping The Community Around Them

  • Concerns Regarding Montgomery Elementary

    News

    Eliminating Fear With Steps of Hope

  • Concerns Regarding Montgomery Elementary

    Off Campus

    $10, 621,683.76 Raised

  • Concerns Regarding Montgomery Elementary

    News

    The 6th Annual “Festival Of Lights”

  • Concerns Regarding Montgomery Elementary

    Off Campus

    A Merry Mercersburg Christmas

  • Concerns Regarding Montgomery Elementary

    Off Campus

    The Effect of Social Media Use on Teens

Navigate Right
The Student News Site of James Buchanan High School
Off Campus