The Rocket Flame

Activity Period Change

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Activity Period Change

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This year JB started the school year off with new students, new teachers, and a new activity period change. Activity period is now after third period compared to past years where it was at the start of the day.  This has been a major adjustment. Faculty would use this time to prepare for classes and students would use this time to check homework and review for tests. 

Mr. Samuel Dickey (Principal) wanted to get a jump start to the student’s academic day. School doors open at 8:00 a.m.  Because of our geographical area, busses are arriving between 8:00- 8:30 a.m. Homeroom ends at 8:35 and students are off to first period.

Students arriving as early as 8 a.m. have 35 minutes of free time to begin their day, while students who are dropped off closer to 8:30 walk in and have to begin their day right away. Dickey feels the best approach is to have students begin their academic day right away while they are productive and have a positive attitude.

“Sometimes our days took forever to get started,” said Dickey.

There are many mixed feelings about the new change and a lot of adjusting. It’s a new experience for students that were used to the same schedule. 

“I can’t do my work in the morning,”  said Evan Clopper (11).

“I have to come to school now right away,” said Syrus Maldonado (12).

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Some feel that with the new activity period change their day goes by faster; instead of having classes back to back, they can have a break between classes. Others feel having activity period first thing in the morning allowed students to ask teachers questions about homework they were not understanding or finish homework from the night before.

“It gives me a break throughout my periods,” said Johnny Crowe (12).

This has been an adjustment for all faculty and students. “It’s a change that’s open for discussion,” said Dickey.

In the past years, students thought activity period was optional in the morning. People would show up late because they had extra time to relax at home. Students now have to come in on time, since we start classes right away. In hopes, Dickey wants to see kids participating in extracurricular activities.

Dancing Through the Decades

President+of+Student+Council%2C+Sarah+Kimmel+%2812%29+paints+a+sign+for+spirit+week.
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Dancing Through the Decades

President of Student Council, Sarah Kimmel (12) paints a sign for spirit week.

President of Student Council, Sarah Kimmel (12) paints a sign for spirit week.

President of Student Council, Sarah Kimmel (12) paints a sign for spirit week.

President of Student Council, Sarah Kimmel (12) paints a sign for spirit week.

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Homecoming has been a tradition at James Buchanan High School for many years. For alumni, it’s a time to reminisce. The student body sees it as a time for dancing and pep rallies; however, for a small group of students it’s the busiest time of the year. The Student Council takes on a hefty workload behind the scenes to make sure this grand event runs smoothly. 

“We had a work day right after school ended last year to plan the dance,” said Bella Shupp (11), “We laid out all the details.” 

This year, Homecoming is much earlier than previous years. This put extra pressure on Student Council members to have everything ready on time. Students usually come to the dance and see the decorations, but don’t realize how much work and planning it requires. They had to book the DJ, make decorations, design t-shirts, and plan the pep rally. 

“We put up flyers and made a bulletin board to help spread the word to get participation,” said Timothy Helman (10). 

The theme is “Dancing Through the Decades.” To promote the theme, the bulletin board was decorated with records and retro fonts. For Spirit Week, each day was a different decade starting with the 50s and ending with the 90s. 

“We chose this theme because it is easy for people to participate,” said Helman.

Many people within the school own Converses, scrunchies, and many other things that were popular fashion trends in past decades. This makes it easy to show school spirit and participate throughout the week. The Student Council also wanted to boost school spirit even more; they plan to do this through the pep rally with fun games and songs. 

“The Homecoming candidates will be singing karaoke,” said Shupp, they will also be doing a fashion show with toilet paper.” 

The Homecoming King candidates this year are: Nick Alfree (12), Brady Bigler (12), Dean King (12), Grant Souder (12), and Jacob Troupe (12). The Homecoming Queen candidates are: Kaitlyn Ebersole (12), Lily Faust (12), Ella Heckman (12), Reilly Heinbaugh (12) and Hannah Kimmel (12). 

“All the seniors nominated candidates,” said Shupp. “Then the whole school is allowed to vote for the final King and Queen.”

Typically the football game is on a Friday night and the dance takes place the next day on a Saturday night, but this year the game and dance are all in the same day. Saturday at 1 PM the game starts. At halftime the King and Queen will be announced, then at 7 PM the dance begins. 

“I just hope that everyone has fun at Homecoming. It’s a time to relax and not worry about school,” said Shupp.  

At the end of last school year, members of Student Council congregated together to plan out next year’s Homecoming. Since then, Student Council has been implementing their ideas that were written down on paper into reality. 

 

A Jamboree to the End of the School Year.

Playing+some+jenga%2C+Sadie+Garbinski+%289%29%2C+Ashley+Alfree+%289%29%2C+Colby+Starr+%2810%29%2C+and+Kaanan+Hissong+%2810%29+work+to+not+knock+down+the+stack.+
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A Jamboree to the End of the School Year.

Playing some jenga, Sadie Garbinski (9), Ashley Alfree (9), Colby Starr (10), and Kaanan Hissong (10) work to not knock down the stack.

Playing some jenga, Sadie Garbinski (9), Ashley Alfree (9), Colby Starr (10), and Kaanan Hissong (10) work to not knock down the stack.

Playing some jenga, Sadie Garbinski (9), Ashley Alfree (9), Colby Starr (10), and Kaanan Hissong (10) work to not knock down the stack.

Playing some jenga, Sadie Garbinski (9), Ashley Alfree (9), Colby Starr (10), and Kaanan Hissong (10) work to not knock down the stack.

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Science Days

The+ap+chemistry+class+poses+for+a+picture+on+the+playground+at+St.+Thomas+Elementary.+Carlee+Jackson+%2811%29%2C+Tanner+Myers+%2811%29%2C+Jordan+Harbold+%2811%29%2C+Alyssa+Blair+%2812%29%2C+Daniel+Corcoran+%2812%29%2C+Trenton+Morgan+%2812%29%2C+Amanda+Sensinger+%2811%29%2C+Dale+MIller+%2812%29%2C+Mackenzie+Saunders+%2811%29%2C+Alyssa+Velasquez-Glant+%2812%29%2C+Kayla+Noll-Bader+%2812%29%2C+Ella+Jones+%2812%29%2C+and+Abby+Carbaugh+%2812%29
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Science Days

The ap chemistry class poses for a picture on the playground at St. Thomas Elementary. Carlee Jackson (11), Tanner Myers (11), Jordan Harbold (11), Alyssa Blair (12), Daniel Corcoran (12), Trenton Morgan (12), Amanda Sensinger (11), Dale MIller (12), Mackenzie Saunders (11), Alyssa Velasquez-Glant (12), Kayla Noll-Bader (12), Ella Jones (12), and Abby Carbaugh (12)

The ap chemistry class poses for a picture on the playground at St. Thomas Elementary. Carlee Jackson (11), Tanner Myers (11), Jordan Harbold (11), Alyssa Blair (12), Daniel Corcoran (12), Trenton Morgan (12), Amanda Sensinger (11), Dale MIller (12), Mackenzie Saunders (11), Alyssa Velasquez-Glant (12), Kayla Noll-Bader (12), Ella Jones (12), and Abby Carbaugh (12)

The ap chemistry class poses for a picture on the playground at St. Thomas Elementary. Carlee Jackson (11), Tanner Myers (11), Jordan Harbold (11), Alyssa Blair (12), Daniel Corcoran (12), Trenton Morgan (12), Amanda Sensinger (11), Dale MIller (12), Mackenzie Saunders (11), Alyssa Velasquez-Glant (12), Kayla Noll-Bader (12), Ella Jones (12), and Abby Carbaugh (12)

The ap chemistry class poses for a picture on the playground at St. Thomas Elementary. Carlee Jackson (11), Tanner Myers (11), Jordan Harbold (11), Alyssa Blair (12), Daniel Corcoran (12), Trenton Morgan (12), Amanda Sensinger (11), Dale MIller (12), Mackenzie Saunders (11), Alyssa Velasquez-Glant (12), Kayla Noll-Bader (12), Ella Jones (12), and Abby Carbaugh (12)

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The ap chemistry class poses for a picture on the playground at St. Thomas Elementary. Carlee Jackson (11), Tanner Myers (11), Jordan Harbold (11), Alyssa Blair (12), Daniel Corcoran (12), Trenton Morgan (12), Amanda Sensinger (11), Dale Miller (12), Mackenzie Saunders (11), Alyssa Velasquez-Glant (12), Kayla Noll-Bader (12), Ella Jones (12), and Abby Carbaugh (12)

On May 16 and 17, The AP Chemistry class at James Buchanan High School went to TSD Elementary schools for a Science Days.  During Science Days, the Chem class walked the elementary students through two experiments to get them excited about science.  After the experiments JBHS students related what they did to a real-life problem and showed how scientists solve problems. On Thursday the students went to St. Thomas and Mt. View and on Friday they went to Mercersburg and Montgomery.  

The project was first introduced by the high schools Chemistry teacher, Mrs. Rebecca Miller (Faculty).  She has been taking her AP Chemistry classes to the elementary schools for a little over ten years.

“I think we had a very successful day,”  said Noah Wise (12). “My favorite part was how excited all the little kids got when learning about science.”

Miller got the experiment ideas this year from the teacher’s science convention. During the Toothpaste Challenge, the students had to empty out a bottle of toothpaste and used their problem solving skills to see how much they could get back into the bottle.  

Hunter Gayman (2) and Chloe Shew (2) work together to get toothpaste back into the bottle during Elementary Science Day.

“The toothpaste lab was my favorite to do with the children because it was fun to see them use their imagination to come up with different ideas to get the toothpaste back into the bottle,” said Daniel Corcoran (12).

This was supposed to replicate when scientists have to quickly clean-up spills that can be harmful to the earth, people, or animals.  

The Copycat Challenge was used to show students how scientist are copycats sometimes when it comes to making new inventions.  An example given to the kids was how scientists got the idea of airplanes from animals like birds, butterflies, and bees.

“The copycat lab was my favorite to do with the kids because we had to remember the color wheel and experiment which colors would  show a desired color,” said Owen Stoner (12).

The challenge consisted of the children mixing different food coloring colors to mimic the color of soda.

Colton Pine (2) and Trey Shandle (2) work together to complete the Copycat Challenge on Elementary Science Day.

After the experiments were complete, the students had time to discuss how they were related to science.  They also had the opportunity to ask the high school students any questions they had about high school.

“It was really fun when the students asked us about high school,” said Corcoran. “We were asked questions from “ Is the lunch at the high school good?” to “ What are your plans after high school?”

In the future, Miller has hopes of expanding and continuing the project. Whether it be going to more grade levels or going to the middle school too.  The elementary science days have an impact on the younger kids and can be very memorable throughout the kids educational career.

All Graduates Need is Money!

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All Graduates Need is Money!

Back Row: Emily Gipe (12), Jakob Line (12), Grace Amsley (12), Abby Carbaugh (12), Lindsay Ambrisco (12). Row 5: Cormac Houpt (12), Owen Stoner (12), Noah Wise (12), Maggie Strawoet (12), Chapin Mowen (12), Saige Heckman (12), Shaelyn Kaiser (12), Madison Dorsey (12). Row 4: Harley Rife (12), Kiersten Siko (12), Kayla Noll-Bader (12), Jarrett Iverson (12), Dylane McCardell (12), Bryce Ocker (12), Anna Zimmerman (12), Jackie Wagaman (12), Aria-Jewel Barnett (12). Row 3: Olivia Harmon (12), Cass Martin (12), Kylei Martin (12), Alyssa Blair (12), Dan Corcoran (12), Dale Miller (12), Emily Newman (12), Jared Moquin (12), Gwen Hunt (12). Row 2: Kristen Louder (12), Chelsea Wareham (12), Madi Shupp (12), Michael Newman (12), Lizzie Pittman (12), Dawson Green (12), Emily Palmerchuck (12), Allison Collings (12), Hannah Zomak (12), Kelsi Parson (12). Front: Kendra Martin (12), Emma Gipe (12), Jakob Dorty (12), Alex Horst (12), Shay Fisher (12), Deanna Grove (12), Ashley Grove (12), Hailey Young (12), Amber Clark (12), Kristin Embly (12).

Back Row: Emily Gipe (12), Jakob Line (12), Grace Amsley (12), Abby Carbaugh (12), Lindsay Ambrisco (12). Row 5: Cormac Houpt (12), Owen Stoner (12), Noah Wise (12), Maggie Strawoet (12), Chapin Mowen (12), Saige Heckman (12), Shaelyn Kaiser (12), Madison Dorsey (12). Row 4: Harley Rife (12), Kiersten Siko (12), Kayla Noll-Bader (12), Jarrett Iverson (12), Dylane McCardell (12), Bryce Ocker (12), Anna Zimmerman (12), Jackie Wagaman (12), Aria-Jewel Barnett (12). Row 3: Olivia Harmon (12), Cass Martin (12), Kylei Martin (12), Alyssa Blair (12), Dan Corcoran (12), Dale Miller (12), Emily Newman (12), Jared Moquin (12), Gwen Hunt (12). Row 2: Kristen Louder (12), Chelsea Wareham (12), Madi Shupp (12), Michael Newman (12), Lizzie Pittman (12), Dawson Green (12), Emily Palmerchuck (12), Allison Collings (12), Hannah Zomak (12), Kelsi Parson (12). Front: Kendra Martin (12), Emma Gipe (12), Jakob Dorty (12), Alex Horst (12), Shay Fisher (12), Deanna Grove (12), Ashley Grove (12), Hailey Young (12), Amber Clark (12), Kristin Embly (12).

Kelley Reeder

Back Row: Emily Gipe (12), Jakob Line (12), Grace Amsley (12), Abby Carbaugh (12), Lindsay Ambrisco (12). Row 5: Cormac Houpt (12), Owen Stoner (12), Noah Wise (12), Maggie Strawoet (12), Chapin Mowen (12), Saige Heckman (12), Shaelyn Kaiser (12), Madison Dorsey (12). Row 4: Harley Rife (12), Kiersten Siko (12), Kayla Noll-Bader (12), Jarrett Iverson (12), Dylane McCardell (12), Bryce Ocker (12), Anna Zimmerman (12), Jackie Wagaman (12), Aria-Jewel Barnett (12). Row 3: Olivia Harmon (12), Cass Martin (12), Kylei Martin (12), Alyssa Blair (12), Dan Corcoran (12), Dale Miller (12), Emily Newman (12), Jared Moquin (12), Gwen Hunt (12). Row 2: Kristen Louder (12), Chelsea Wareham (12), Madi Shupp (12), Michael Newman (12), Lizzie Pittman (12), Dawson Green (12), Emily Palmerchuck (12), Allison Collings (12), Hannah Zomak (12), Kelsi Parson (12). Front: Kendra Martin (12), Emma Gipe (12), Jakob Dorty (12), Alex Horst (12), Shay Fisher (12), Deanna Grove (12), Ashley Grove (12), Hailey Young (12), Amber Clark (12), Kristin Embly (12).

Kelley Reeder

Kelley Reeder

Back Row: Emily Gipe (12), Jakob Line (12), Grace Amsley (12), Abby Carbaugh (12), Lindsay Ambrisco (12). Row 5: Cormac Houpt (12), Owen Stoner (12), Noah Wise (12), Maggie Strawoet (12), Chapin Mowen (12), Saige Heckman (12), Shaelyn Kaiser (12), Madison Dorsey (12). Row 4: Harley Rife (12), Kiersten Siko (12), Kayla Noll-Bader (12), Jarrett Iverson (12), Dylane McCardell (12), Bryce Ocker (12), Anna Zimmerman (12), Jackie Wagaman (12), Aria-Jewel Barnett (12). Row 3: Olivia Harmon (12), Cass Martin (12), Kylei Martin (12), Alyssa Blair (12), Dan Corcoran (12), Dale Miller (12), Emily Newman (12), Jared Moquin (12), Gwen Hunt (12). Row 2: Kristen Louder (12), Chelsea Wareham (12), Madi Shupp (12), Michael Newman (12), Lizzie Pittman (12), Dawson Green (12), Emily Palmerchuck (12), Allison Collings (12), Hannah Zomak (12), Kelsi Parson (12). Front: Kendra Martin (12), Emma Gipe (12), Jakob Dorty (12), Alex Horst (12), Shay Fisher (12), Deanna Grove (12), Ashley Grove (12), Hailey Young (12), Amber Clark (12), Kristin Embly (12).

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On May 14, 65 students from James Buchanan High School participated in the Senior Awards Ceremony. At the ceremony, students were given a numerous awards that had varying amounts of money. In total, there was an estimate of $200,000 in awards that were given out to students.

Gavin Barnhart (12) receives a department award from Mr. Thomas Bradley (Faculty).

At the ceremony, 175 awards were offered from the school and local businesses in the area. There were a couple of awards that did not deal with money. Amber Clark (12) received the Violet Clark award in honor of her sister.

“…The person who gets that award is supposed to exemplify everything that Violet stood for and being like a younger sister, that was something that she put onto Amber,” said Olivia Harmon (12).

In order for students to receive these awards, there is a certain criteria that a student must meet to qualify for the award. Things like career path, where a person lives, and GPA all are considered when choosing winners.

“The first main criteria is to fill out the universal application,” said Mrs. Mary Cristofano (Faculty). “[…] We eliminate those who do not fit the criteria, and then we look at the student’s need and how they represent the purpose of the award.”

For some students, getting an award, especially the Glazier award, was something that students were most anxious about. This award gave 17 students $2,361 dollars each.

“Towards the end when they were giving out the Glazier award, I felt nervous because only the top 20 people get it…” said Emily Newman (12).

The amount of money that was given to students will help pay for tuition as well as other necessities for college.

“I will be using my money for board and room because (F&M) gave me a full tuition college scholarship, and it will help pay for my books,” said Kelsi Parson (12).

Mr. Dickey ended the ceremony by acknowledging the students who came and received awards for their achievements throughout high school. With one last cheer, the proud parents of 65 students applaud for the Class of 2019. 

A Louder Finale

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A Louder Finale

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If you went to James Buchanan Middle School, chances are you saw Mr. Gary Louder (Faculty) at least once. The 2018-2019 school year is the last year you’ll see Louder, though. After 35 years in the Tuscarora School District, Louder is retiring at the end of the school year.

As a graduate of Altoona Area High School, he stayed local for his first two years of college. He attended Penn State’s Altoona campus for his first two years, then transferred to the main campus to finish his studies. After graduating from Penn State with a Bachelor’s in Music Education, he first began teaching in Oneonta, New York before returning to his home state to teach for a couple years in Potter County, Pennsylvania.

“After starting my teaching career, I went back to Penn State during the summers and received my Master’s Degree in Music Education,” Louder said.

After leaving Potter County, Louder was interviewed for an opening at JBMS. The opening was for the seventh- and eighth-grade Band director, which he was then hired for. For the beginning of his career at the middle school, that was all that he taught, but as the years progressed, he took on more duties.

“For the past eleven years, I have directed the Middle School Orchestra,” said Louder, “and for the past nine years, the sixth-grade Band.”

Louder conducts the high school Band as they play “Liberty March.”

It’s not just the middle school that Louder teaches at, though. For the past two years, Louder has been teaching elementary band lessons. He also served at the assistant high school band director for seventeen years.

“The Mummer’s Parade and the Apple Blossom Parade are our two big trips for the year,” Louder said. “However, the band also marches at the Mercersburg Halloween Parade and the Mercersburg and St. Thomas Memorial Day Parades, as well as participating in the Homecoming Parade.”

With parades every year and thirty-five years in Tuscarora alone, many memories are made. Louder’s favorite memory with the JBMS Band is when they were selected as the Junior Royalty Parade Honor Band for the 2010 Buckhannon, West Virginia Strawberry Festival. They traveled by coach bus, spent Friday and Saturday marching in parades, and toured the West Virginia University football and basketball venues on the way back.

“Another memorable trip was when the band marched in a 4th of July parade in downtown Washington, D.C., representing Mercersburg as one of the birthplaces of an American president,” said Louder.

Louder has represented Mercersburg in surrounding states, but he’s also active in the musical community of Mercersburg.

“Out of school, I have been director of the Mercersburg Area Community Band for the last 14 years,” Louder said.

Louder speaks during his time on stage.

Once summer rolls around and Louder has officially retired, he will still be directing the Mercersburg Area Community Band. As Louder leaves the school, he offers advice to new teachers.

“Find a school district where you feel comfortable and determine what age group fits your personality and teaching talents,” said Louder.

Alongside his regular summer routine of directing, Louder plans to vacation at the seashore. He also looks forward to having free time to do what he wants, when he wants. However, he also still has duties at home.

“If this summer is anything like last year, I’ll spend the rest of the summer mowing my lawn,” said Louder.

With Louder’s 35 years in Tuscarora School District, plus more in other school districts, he has inspired hundreds of students to continue playing music after they’ve left him at the middle school.

 

Rockets Catching the Dub for School Spirit

Cass+Martin+%2812%29+and+Hannah+Kimmel+%2811%29+lip+sync+their+portion+of+the+Lip+Dub+project+as+Austin+Thomas+%2810%29+films+and+Mr.+Kevin+Gustafson+%28Faculty%29+carries+a+speaker+with+the+music.
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Rockets Catching the Dub for School Spirit

Cass Martin (12) and Hannah Kimmel (11) lip sync their portion of the Lip Dub project as Austin Thomas (10) films and Mr. Kevin Gustafson (Faculty) carries a speaker with the music.

Cass Martin (12) and Hannah Kimmel (11) lip sync their portion of the Lip Dub project as Austin Thomas (10) films and Mr. Kevin Gustafson (Faculty) carries a speaker with the music.

Emma Gipe

Cass Martin (12) and Hannah Kimmel (11) lip sync their portion of the Lip Dub project as Austin Thomas (10) films and Mr. Kevin Gustafson (Faculty) carries a speaker with the music.

Emma Gipe

Emma Gipe

Cass Martin (12) and Hannah Kimmel (11) lip sync their portion of the Lip Dub project as Austin Thomas (10) films and Mr. Kevin Gustafson (Faculty) carries a speaker with the music.

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On Tuesday May 7 the faculty and students at James Buchanan High School showed what being a Rocket is all about during their morning activity period.  Students in Mr. Kevin Gustafson’s (Faculty) Sports and Entertainment Marketing classes planned a Lip Dub in which the whole school participated. Every club, sports team, student and faculty member were shown off in the lip-syncing video.

Students in the class stayed after school Monday to decorated the halls with balloons, streamers, and posters sporting our school colors and cheering on the Rockets to show off during the video. Also, most students wore green and white to show school spirit, representing their various organizations.

“Coach G had the idea last year and showed us a couple of different schools doing lip dubs, which made us decide to plan our own,” said Madison Bailey (11).

The Lip Dub project showcased clubs like National Honors Society, Foreign Exchange Club, Work Co-Op, and sports like Football, Softball, Baseball, and Boys’ and Girls’ Tennis. 

Many people helped plan the Lip dub to make it run as smoothly as possible. Each club or sport was assigned to an area in the hallway. As a mashup of popular songs played over the loudspeaker of the school, students from Gustafson’s class filmed each club and sports team.

“We had to first start with songs,” said Bailey. “Considering what songs were the most popular and unblocked from the United States on YouTube.”

A map of where the clubs and sports teams were supposed to stand helped keep everything organized. A designated singer was assigned to certain areas in the school that walked through as each song played.

Kelley Reeder
Austin Thomas (10) and Mr. Kevin Gustafson (Faculty) pose for a photo after the third run of the Lip Dub Project on Tuesday. Austin was behind the camera and Mr. Gustafson had a speaker to play the music.

“Most of the student body was involved,” said Trenton Bradley (12). “We welcomed all clubs and sports teams to participate and we trusted them with the freedom to do their own act.”

There was even an activity period where everyone spent time practicing for the Lip Dub to work out some small kinks before the actual video was filmed.

“We even timed all the different switches between hallways and turns and began to place clubs in their different areas on the map,” said Bailey.

 

After all the clubs and sports were featured in the Lip Dub, everyone sprinted to the gym for a miniature pep rally where teachers and students did the wave and cheered. The drum line also pepped up the crowd for the video while the basketball team dunked to show our school spirit as a grand finale in the Lip Dub.

The Sports and Entertainment Marketing Class is now working on the editing process. They have to put all the clips together and add the music to make the final product.

“Expect to see the Lip Dub within the following weeks of filming,” said Bradley. “Definitely before the end of the 2019 school year.”

When the finished product of the Lip Dub project arrives, the James Buchanan student body will see all the work, planning and editing put in to make this happen.

“It was a lot, but between the two Sports and Entertainment Marketing classes and students, it became a huge success,” said Bailey.

 

 

2019 Special Olympics

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2019 Special Olympics

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On May 1 2019, the James Buchanan High school hosted their own Special Olympics. Taking place at the rocket stadium, schools in the Tuscarora school district bussed their kids to the stadium early Wednesday morning.  With a total of 42 participants; 19 high school participants, 9 Middle School, and 14 elementary school students. Each student competed at 3 events; softball throw, track race, and the long jump. Each school was put into different teams which competed against each other in the different events. Every participant was given 3 tries to get a better distance/score, when the participant finished they were given a popsicle stick telling them what place they received. All the students were happy as they showed off their multiple ribbons to the volunteers as well as their own parents who were welcome to attend the event. The day was filled with lots of cheering and encouragement as students had a chance to come out of their shell and express themselves.

Spring Has Sprung At One North Coffee Shop

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Spring Has Sprung At One North Coffee Shop

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Spring has sprung! One North Coffee Shop in Mercersburg, PA welcomes spring with a pop-up shop of decadent treats ranging from cupcakes to brownies to cakes. Flowers galore of all colors were present, as well as jewelry to spruce up colorful outfits to welcome the warm weather. The spring atmosphere was alive and well at One North Coffee Shop.

Decision Day

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A Journey to College

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A Journey to College

Dickinson College

Dickinson College

Dickinson College

Dickinson College

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Deciding where to attend college can be a stressful decision to make. There are many factors you have to take into consideration when choosing the school that is best fit for you. For instance “Do I want to go to a small school or large school?” or “Do I want to attend a school located in an urban or rural area?”

 

On April 24, 11 juniors went on a college visit to Millersville University and Dickinson College. On their visit, they attended an informational session and got to tour the campus. This visit allowed students to maybe get an idea about the kind of school they want to attend and what to expect next time they go on a college visit.

 

“College visits are important to allow students to see the different opportunities offered,” said Ms. Amy Violante (Faculty). “It’s important to experience the culture and what the college or university is all about.”

 

The first stop was Millersville University. Millersville is a four-year public state university. They have about 7,000 undergraduate students and some of their academic programs include: Education, Meteorology, Engineering, Safety and Technology, and others.

“I liked the larger school because it will give me more of an opportunity to figure out what I want to do,” said Sebastian Wise (11). “I think that having a bigger school will open more doors.”

 

After Millersville, the next stop was Dickinson College. Located in Carlisle, PA. Dickinson is a four-year private liberal arts college. They have about 2,400 undergraduate students and some of their academic programs include: Biochemistry, Business, Dance, Pre-law, Sustainability, and others.

 

“One thing I liked about Dickison was that since it’s a smaller school, it allows more one on one interaction with professors,” said Zach Slodysko (11).

 

Deciding on a College or University to attend can be difficult, but visiting different schools allows you to explore your many options. Below are 10 tips to help ensure a successful college visit.

 

10 Helpful Tips to College Visits

 

 

  • Research the college before you visit

 

 

  • Take the student-led tour of campus

 

 

  • Look into life beyond academics

 

 

  • Eat in the dining hall

 

 

  • Check out the dorms

 

 

  • Examine classrooms and lecture halls

 

 

  • Visit the admissions office

 

 

  • Take notes

 

 

  • Have an idea about what you like in a school

 

 

  • Ask lots of questions

 

 

Roses Are Red, Violets Are Blue, I’d Like To Go To Prom With You

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Roses Are Red, Violets Are Blue, I’d Like To Go To Prom With You

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What do marriages and proms have in common? Proposals! Or rather, “promposals” for high school juniors and seniors.

Writing out your ideas can help you eliminate ones you don’t like as much.

Couples and friends use promposals to ask each other to prom. If you don’t have your prom date yet, here are a few tips from students that have already “promposed” to their dates.

“To plan my promposal, I just sort of talked to my friends,” said Dylan Poffenberger (11). “I asked them what they thought I should do.”

Dylan Poffenberger (11) uses a letter to ask Allison Collings (12) to prom.

It doesn’t have to be just up to you. Use other friends as a resource to help come up with ideas. When brainstorming a way to ask his date to prom, Poffenberger and his friends came up with a promposal using the song “Please, Mr. Postman” by the Marvelettes.

“I used a satchel,” Poffenberger said, acting as the postman who brought a letter that asked his date to prom. “I had to borrow it from one of my friends.”

In addition to asking friends for ideas, it pays to ask friends to help with the promposal itself. Poffenberger borrowed a mail satchel from a friend, and Jackie Wagaman (12) got some help from the clarinet section when she asked Michael Newman (12) to prom.

“Michael hinted that we should go to prom together, but the elephant in the room was the promposal,” said Wagaman. “So, being the non-traditional lady that I am, I promposed to him, because I’m a giving person and I like planning things like that for my friends.”

Wagaman gifted Newman a bag of coffee in the promposal, as she knew that Newman liked to drink coffee. Poffenberger knew that his date, Allison Collings (12), also liked cuties oranges, so he got her a bag to go along with his promposal.

Ashley Alfree (9), Kennedy Sauders (9), Sadie Garbinski (9), and Hailey Embree (10) spell out “Prom” for Jackie Wagaman (12) as she asks Michael Newman (12) to prom.

“Make sure that [your promposal] is cute and the person that you’re asking will like it,” Poffenberger said.

Making sure that your date will like their promposal is one of the most important parts, as well as making sure that it’s sincere. Poffenberger also advised having the promposal be something that’s special to the person that you’re asking. The promposal doesn’t have to be one that’s in the middle of the cafeteria during lunch, with balloons and posters. It can be simple and straightforward, as simple as just writing “prom?” on a cup of coffee.

“Sometimes, less is best,” Wagaman said. “Focus on the moment and the person.”

Wagaman also said that by making the moment special and memorable for your date, it will make it memorable for you in turn.

Nick Alfree (11) utilizes a flag to ask his date to prom at the Indoor Color Guard championships.

“I would say just make sure you think about it, but don’t think about it too much,” said Poffenberger.

The basic tips of planning a promposal? Brainstorm with your friends; put your heads together because you’ll be bound to get an idea that works. Make sure that it’s special and memorable for the person you want to ask, and then it’ll be special for you as well. Prompose to them in a way that they’ll appreciate. You don’t want to embarrass them by having a large, public promposal planned if they’d rather have something small and quiet. Finally, don’t stress if it doesn’t turn out perfect; it’s the little quirks and flaws that make moments memorable.

 

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