The Rocket Flame

A Royal Night

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A Royal Night

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200 little princesses from four kingdoms—St. Thomas, Montgomery, Mountain View, and Mercersburg—arrived with their royal escorts to a ball held at James Buchanan High School. Little girls from the four elementary schools were accompanied by their fathers at the first daddy-daughter dance hosted by the Rocket Band.

On December 14, the James Buchanan High School band hosted a fundraising event in the form of a dance for girls in elementary school. The mastermind behind the night, band director Mrs. Sheryl Deike (Faculty) said she got the idea for a daddy-daughter dance from her daughter.

“My oldest daughter did it down in Appomattox, Virginia,” said Deike. “They didn’t do any pre-sales, they just advertised it, thinking maybe, you know, twenty or thirty [fathers and daughters would come]. They said the gym was filled.”

Deike did not expect to have the same large turnout as her daughter. By selling tickets ahead of time, Deike expected to have a few more fathers and daughters, but not enough to fill the cafeteria, where the dance was held.

“50, maybe 75 tops,” Deike said. “It came out to 200 hundred kids.”

Using the people at her disposal, Deike enlisted percussion instructor Michael Seville to D.J.

200 daughters meant 200 fathers, the only ones that had to pay for a ticket. The daughters got in free, and dads paid five dollars. In ticket sales alone, the band brought in $1,000, plus what they made from dads buying the snacks and carnations that were for sale. Aside from earning money for music programs, Deike wanted to bring the community together.

“I just wanted to do something sweet for the community,” said Deike. “I thought it was a nice idea.”

Along with having the dance for the community, Deike wanted everyone to see the Band.

“I guess it was a selfish thing, trying to get kids or people coming up to the high school to see us,” said Deike. “We’re not just about making music.”

Kennedy Saunders (9), Dawson Green (12), Sadie Garbinski (9), and Emily Horst (10) hand out punch and pretzels.

The dance was staffed entirely by Band students that volunteered to help out, as well as instructors. Band members ran games for the girls in the band room and played Frozen in the auditorium. Others ran snack tables in the lobby, giving out free punch and pretzels and selling bags of chips, cookies, and candy.

Deike already has plans to hold an event for mothers and sons in the spring. She also plans to hold another daddy-daughter dance next year. According to Deike, the daddy-daughter dance is the band’s “golden nugget.” It’s the special fundraiser they do that’s specific to them, but it also gives little princesses from Tuscarora School District’s four elementary schools a special evening with their fathers.

 

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The 6th Annual “Festival Of Lights”

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The 6th Annual “Festival Of Lights”

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Hannah Zomak, Editor

Hannah Zomak is 18 years old and this is her third year on the James Buchanan Student Media staff.  She feels lucky to be an editor of the yearbook and...

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Diving In At James Buchanan

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Diving In At James Buchanan

Ms. Angi Johnson (Faculty) smiles on the pool deck at James Buchanan High School.

Ms. Angi Johnson (Faculty) smiles on the pool deck at James Buchanan High School.

Ms. Angi Johnson (Faculty) smiles on the pool deck at James Buchanan High School.

Ms. Angi Johnson (Faculty) smiles on the pool deck at James Buchanan High School.

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On October 29, 2018, Ms. Angie Johnson (Faculty) started as the new swim instructor at James Buchanan High School. Prior to her new job as a swim instructor, Johnson had been an aquatics director at the Chambersburg YMCA for 12 years.

Growing up in Hawaii,  Johnson has been around water her whole life.  As a child, her mother and father would always take her to pools and water parks.  Kings Dominion was Johnson’s first water park. She feels most comfortable in the water or on the pool deck.

“Basically water is my life,” said Johnson.

Wanting to put her love for water to good use, Johnson became the Aquatics Director at the YMCA.  Her job entailed teaching swim lessons to all ages, teaching and making sure kids know water safety, and also managing the lifeguards that were on duty to make sure everyone maintains safety. As soon as Johnson started teaching Aquatics, she instantly knew her life came to a full circle.

“Water safety is very important and everyone needs to be aware of how dangerous water can be,” said Johnson. “But it can be so much fun too.”

Johnson has been smoothly transitioning into her new position as the new swim instructor.  Students all seem to agree that Ms. Johnson is an excellent teacher.

Abigail Nagy (9) and Makinna Peck (9) smile for a picture before going to swim class.

“She is very helpful as a teacher and always explains what to do, sometimes even through example,” said Makinna Peck (9).

Peck and Nagy really appreciate the fact that Johnson will go the extra mile by getting into the pool with them and taking the time to explain how to do different skills.

“I think Ms. Johnson is doing a good job of keeping us on task and keeping us busy,” said Abigail Nagy (9).

The students especially enjoy how Johnson changes up the class every day.  For example, on Mondays and Wednesdays, they do water fitness. Tuesdays and Thursdays, they do water aerobics, and Friday is a free day.  

“Aquatics is different this year because there aren’t as many students, sand Samuel Ocasio (11).  “So it’s fun because we

Samuel Ocasio (11) swims during his special aquatics class.

get to change it up every day.”

Johnson is excited to give high school students an opportunity to do a different type of physical education that is water-based.  She is also looking forward to giving the high school students an opportunity to teach the elementary children as she did in high school.

“I am just really excited to be here, and it’s going to be an amazing experience, I just know it,” said Johnson. “Everybody so far has been so welcoming and friendly.”

Ms. Angi Johnson (Faculty) teaches Alexis Snyder (9) and Samuel Ocasio (11) about the breaststroke.

Alyssa Blair, Staff

Alyssa Blair is a a first-year member of the James Buchanan Student Media staff.  She is a senior at James Buchanan High School and is very involved. ...

A Day in the Life of Life Skills: More Than Just A Class

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A Day in the Life of Life Skills: More Than Just A Class

Edward Leevy (10) smiling for a picture while unloading boxes

Edward Leevy (10) smiling for a picture while unloading boxes

Edward Leevy (10) smiling for a picture while unloading boxes

Edward Leevy (10) smiling for a picture while unloading boxes

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   Throughout the school day, your routine probably consists of doing the same things, but have you ever thought about how some other classes spend their day?

  The Life Skills Class routine ranges to something different every day. A couple days a week, a group of kids will go to Mercersburg Academy and help clean up the dining hall. If it is a work day, the students leave after the announcements and help at their assigned area for a couple of hours.

  Then, two days a week, the students go to Target and help there, too. Their duties change daily Some days they will unload trucks that come in, and other days they stock up the shelves with the items that are delivered.

  “It helps them with things they will need in their everyday lives and in a job,” said Mrs. Kristy Horst (Faculty).

  The students not only learn what it is like to have a job and a set routine, but also how to interact with people. Working at Target and the Academy gives them that chance.

  After the students come back from their duties, they will go and have lunch together during 8th period. When lunch is over, they then go to Art.

   “I think the most important part is that they’re just able to come in and unwind and be creative and whoever they wanna be,” said Maggie Strawoet (12). 

 

Gregory Murray (11) works on his art project with his classmates Kaitlyn Miller (9) and Justin Mellott (9)

For most of them, it is their favorite period of the day. They do different art projects together and on Fridays, Mrs. Kayla Chambers-Matulevich (Faculty) plays songs they suggest.

  Lastly, the students finish their day by helping out in the school. During 10th period, several students go and empty all the recycling bins in the classrooms. They then take it outside to the larger recycling bin. This gives the students an opportunity to clean and help out all the teachers.

  Now even though every day differs, this is what a typical day looks for this class. Through spending time together, all of the students have formed friendships with not only each other but with their peers throughout the school and community, and they certainly are a light in the school.

 

Julia Trei, Staff

Julia Trei is 15-years old and a sophomore at James Buchanan High School. Her hobbies include running and shopping. Her favorite color is yellow and her...

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Cans Donated, Toys Collected

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Cans Donated, Toys Collected

Encouraging fellow classmates, Claire Kriner (11) and Timothy Helman (9) get excited for the holiday season.

Encouraging fellow classmates, Claire Kriner (11) and Timothy Helman (9) get excited for the holiday season.

Encouraging fellow classmates, Claire Kriner (11) and Timothy Helman (9) get excited for the holiday season.

Encouraging fellow classmates, Claire Kriner (11) and Timothy Helman (9) get excited for the holiday season.

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The holidays are thought to be a time with big family dinners, buying and receiving gifts, and getting a little extra money added to your paycheck. The streets are filled with string lights and cheer all throughout the final months of the year. This might be your view of this season, but less fortunate families may not see it the exact same way. They might see it as the more stressful time of year and may find it difficult to make ends meet. Have you ever thought about how you could bring holiday joy to these families’ lives?

The James Buchanan student body has been outwardly striving to help families in need during this Christmas season. These attempts have included food drives with canned goods and toy collections. Certain students feel that, by doing these things, it not only helps other people, but it can also join everyone together as a school.

“When we help each other out, it just connects our school more closely together…” said Claire Kriner (11).

Student Council began the canned food and toy collection on Nov. 28 and is continuing it throughout the month of December. Boxes wrapped in festive wrapping paper were placed inside of classrooms to collect these items.

A donation box is placed inside of Miss May’s (Faculty) homeroom in preparation of the food and toy drive.

“We get donations from businesses sometimes, but we want to encourage lots of your classmates to donate food so we can have enough food for people,” said Meredith Iverson (10), “because it benefits people in this school district.”

In order to motivate students to donate items, Student Council has come up with an idea that allows homerooms to compete for points. Getting points depends on how many and what kinds of objects each homeroom provides for less fortunate families. The homeroom that receives the most points wins the competition.

Outside of the art room, Lizzie Pittman (12) contributes items to her homeroom’s donation box.

“It’s a way that our school can give items to families in need that might not have everything.” said Kriner.

Members of the student body feel it is a moral obligation for them to make Christmas a happier time for other people who may struggle during the holidays. They also want to encourage others to realize that Christmas is not just about receiving gifts.

“I just want to get a stronger sense of positivity because I know that not many people in our school think about this stuff,” said Bella Shupp (10), “They don’t think about people that are struggling, so I think this will really help everyone in the school see that Christmas is about more than just getting stuff for yourself.”

During the holiday season this year, James Buchanan has been making efforts to focus less on themselves and more so on families that may struggle in providing necessary items or affording gifts for their children. Students believe that they can make a positive change in the community if they work together as a school.

Eva Dempsey, Staff

Eva Dempsey is 15-years old and she is in her sophomore year at James Buchanan High School. Her favorite color is yellow and her favorite food is pizza....

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A Merry Mercersburg Christmas

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A Merry Mercersburg Christmas

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It’s the beginning of the most wonderful time of the year, and the decorations around town show it. Wreaths are hanging off parking meters, the light poles are draped in garland, and local businesses adorn various ensembles of decorations. The staple of Mercersburg’s festive spirit is located in the square, and it stands tall with sparkling lights and ornaments: the Christmas tree.

On Nov. 24, the Tuscarora Area Chamber of Commerce held a Merry Mercersburg Tree Lighting from 4-7pm. Many

Celebrating their first birthday, One North gave out free cake to their customers in flavors vanilla, chocolate, and ginger.

businesses came together to generate a festive atmosphere.

A center of the evening’s events revolved around the local coffee shop, One North. The fairly new business celebrated

their first birthday on Nov. 24. To any customer who stopped by, there was a free slice of birthday cake. Also, there was free coffee and hot chocolate being offered outside to anyone attending the lighting. For the children, Christmas crafts were available in the shop.

For One North, this one-year journey has been full of a lot of changes and progress.

“The entire store has grown and improved very rapidly. Just recently we tore down a wall and put in a bakery case, literally overnight, to display our talented baker’s hard work and efforts,” said Logan Williams (12), who works at One North.

The coffee shop is still working on how to improve their business.  

Some businesses gave out free goodies during the Merry Mercersburg Tree Lighting. Shay Fisher (12) enjoys free milk and cookies from Agronomy Inc.

“I foresee us being open on Monday every week rather than being closed,” said Williams.  “People enjoy being there and want to spend as much time there as they can.”

While Christmas music played throughout the square, several vendors gathered to offer their goods up. Agronomy Inc. gave away free cookies and milk for people to munch on as they shopped around. Other businesses were also attending, such as Snider’s Elevator.

The Rocket Band was also a vendor, selling baked goods to raise money to give to the Music Boosters.

“We are here supporting the JB Music Boosters to help raise money for everything we need for our indoor program,” said Lauren Ramsey (10). “There’s a lot of things parents do to raise money that not a lot of people know about, so I like to come out and help with that.”

Raising money for the Music Boosters, Lauren Ramsey (10) and Hannah Hicks (7) sell baked goods.

The band had sold a lot of goods, as a lot of people turned out to show their support.

“There’s been a lot of people coming by, buying whole things (baked goods) and using them for parties and other things

like that,” said Ramsey.

At 6 o’clock, Mr. and Mrs. Santa Claus made an appearance. After riding in on a fire truck from Mercersburg Volunteer

Fire Department, they stopped by to take photos with kids and those young at heart.

The Mercersburg tree was lit at 6:30 pm on the square.

Then, at 6:30, the tree was lit. After a speech was given, the many people attending the lighting gathered around to countdown for the tree. This year’s tree was donated by M&T Bank and stands tall in front of the business on the square.

The last event of the night was held at the Star Theatre. It’s A Wonderful Life was played for free. Along with the movie, free popcorn, drinks, and candy were given out. The movie was sponsored by the Mercersburg Academy. The star of the Christmas classic, Jimmy Stewart, was a Mercersburg Academy graduate.

It’s just the end of November, but Christmas cheer is already being spread throughout Mercersburg. The lighting of the Christmas tree on Nov. 24 was not just that, but it was also an event filled with giving from local businesses and holiday festivities.

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The Effect of Social Media Use on Teens

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Social media allows us to share ideas and creations with others, network, and be able to show expressions of our personality. With the current popular platforms teens have been using, they are able to form new relationships with others, share pictures that they took, and update people on their lives. While in theory social media is great place to partake in all of these activities, teens that are active on these sites can be at a greater risk for anxiety and depression.

 

The number of hours of screen time you are active on social media can affect your mental health.

 

An article posted in Clinical Psychological Science took a nationally represented survey of children in grades 8 to 12 and national suicide statistics from ages 13 to 18, and they found that children who are more active on social media were more likely to report their mental health concerns.

 

The number of social media sites you are on can also set you at a greater risk.

 

A study was published in Computers in Human Behavior that found the use of various social media sites is strongly associated with depression. This study concluded that teens who are on seven or more social media sites had a three times more likely risk of getting depression, and kids that are on two or less sites had a lesser risk.

 

When scrolling through social media, it causes teens to see “perfect” images that others post, causing them the pressure of wanting and feeling like they have to be like them. They feel pressure to have perfect photos and well-written posts like the posts they see, which can cause a great deal of anxiety. Girls are mainly susceptible to this due to them wanting to compare themselves to others to develop their identities.

 

A survey conducted in the UK in the Royal Society for Public Health asked kids ages 14-24 how social media platforms affected their mental health. The study concluded that social media platforms such as Snapchat, Facebook, and Instagram all led to increased feelings of depression, poor body image, and loneliness.

 

Whenever kids make friendships over social media, they can become too emotionally invested in them, and never get a chance to recollect themselves. Without a break you can get emotionally depleted, causing anxiety to appear more easily.

 

“Whatever we think of the ‘relationships’ maintained and in some cases initiated on social media, kids never get a break from them,” says Dr. Wick in the article How Using Social Media Affects Teenagers by Rachel Ehmke. Dr. Wick continues to say, “These days he might just disappear from your screen, and you never get to have the ‘What did I do?’ conversation.”

 

Due to being ignored, the “what did I do thought” will remain in their head, causing anxiety. This can lead to them thinking the worst about themselves which puts them at a greater risk for depression.

 

Social media not only can affect the way we think but can also affect the way we sleep.

 

Another study conducted in the UK published in the Journal of Youth Studies took 900 kids around 12-15 years old and surveyed them about their social media use. What they found was that one-fifth of the teens said they “almost always” wake up during the night and log in to social media. Kids need more sleep than adults, and with them waking up in the middle of the night to check their social media causes them to not get the sleep they need. This can be detrimental to their health, mentally and physically. The lack of sleep can make them more irritable, as well as lower their immune system causing them to be more susceptible to illness.

 

The human brain develops so much during the teenage years, and if you are constantly on social media, it can impact that growth. Being on these sites often can cause poor communication skills, lower your self esteem, and in the end, raise your stakes for being at risk for mental health concerns.

 

“Offline, the gold standard advice for helping kids build healthy self-esteem is to get them involved in something that they’re interested in,” says Sherri Gordon in the article, 5 Ways Social Media Affects Teen Mental Health.

If you get yourself involved in something you are interested in, it will boost your self esteem.

Sherri Gordon then continues to state, “When kids learn to feel good about what they can do instead of how they look and what they own, they’re happier and better prepared for success in real life.” This will help reduce their risk of feelings of anxiety and depression.

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The History of the Armistice

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The History of the Armistice

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You’ve probably heard someone say, “It’s 11:11, make a wish!” The number 11 is supposed to be lucky. To the soldiers fighting in World War I, it was.

World War I began in 1914 following the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, the heir to the Austria-Hungarian throne, according to Robert Green’s book, World War I. Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia (where the assassins were from), and their allies were pulled into the fight. This began the Great War, initially only involving Eurasian countries.

The war raged on, involving more and more countries. The United States, under Woodrow Wilson’s presidency, chose to remain neutral for three years. They provided weapons, equipment, and other supplies to both sides of the war—the Allies and the Central Powers.

Following the sinking of a passenger ship, the RMS Lusitania, and the Zimmerman Telegram, citizens of the United States pushed Woodrow Wilson to join the war. He met with Congress to request a declaration of war. According to Stewart Ross’s book, World War I, Congress agreed on April 6, 1917. The United States was now involved in the war.

The United States joined the war opposing Austria-Hungary and Germany. The U.S. sided with the Allies, which included Great Britain, France, Serbia, Italy, and Russia (before they withdrew from the war).

A little over a year later, the Central Powers were starting to crumble. According to Green, the Austrians surrendered to the Italians, the Hungarians dissociated themselves from Austria, and the Allies moved in on Germany. The German army held strong, but Kaiser Wilhelm II didn’t.

On November 10, 1918, the last emperor of Germany fled to the Netherlands, according to Green. The remaining government of Germany met with the Allies the following day.

Ross, Stewart. World War I. World Almanac Library, 2005.

“At 11 a.m. on November 11, 1918, Germany and the Allies signed an armistice that brought all hostilities to an end,” Stewart Ross wrote in his book, World War I.

November 11 became known as Armistice Day and was celebrated as marking the end of the Great War. Peace conferences began in January of the following year, 1919. In these conferences, President Wilson proposed his Fourteen Points, which included an international peacekeeping organization, the League of Nations.

The terms of the Treaty of Versailles and other treaties signed following the end of World War I were humiliating for the losing side, according to Ross. These humiliating terms led to World War II twenty years later, where the United States was pulled into the war again once it was in full swing.

Wars that followed World War I included the second World War, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War, among others. Within these wars, many lives were lost. This is why Armistice Day would eventually become known as Veterans’ Day. It still falls on November 11, but now it serves as a day to remember soldiers that lost their lives in the wars, as well as men and women currently serving.

November 11, 2018 marks a hundred years since the signing of the armistice. Around the world, countries held events to honor the end of World War I and those that died fighting in it. In Washington D.C., there was a parade celebrating the hundred years that have passed since the Great War ended.

The signing of the armistice meant an end to bloody battles, where soldiers risked their lives living in muddy trenches. At 11 a.m. on November 11, the bloody battles ceased. The soldiers could leave the war behind, returning to being civilians instead. Maybe the end to the war was their 11:11 wish.

 

Deanna Grove, Staff

Deanna Grove is a senior at James Buchanan High School. This is her first year as part of the JB Student Media staff, and she's always busy taking part...

A Spook-tacular Day

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A Spook-tacular Day

Getting into the Halloween spirit, Jacob Troupe (11), Nick Alfree (11), Patrick Hicks (11), Zach Slodysko (11), Dylan Poffenberger (11), and Mason Younker (11) dress up as the band KISS.

Getting into the Halloween spirit, Jacob Troupe (11), Nick Alfree (11), Patrick Hicks (11), Zach Slodysko (11), Dylan Poffenberger (11), and Mason Younker (11) dress up as the band KISS.

Getting into the Halloween spirit, Jacob Troupe (11), Nick Alfree (11), Patrick Hicks (11), Zach Slodysko (11), Dylan Poffenberger (11), and Mason Younker (11) dress up as the band KISS.

Getting into the Halloween spirit, Jacob Troupe (11), Nick Alfree (11), Patrick Hicks (11), Zach Slodysko (11), Dylan Poffenberger (11), and Mason Younker (11) dress up as the band KISS.

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October is a season full of carving pumpkins, dressing up, and lots of sweets. Student Council decided to celebrate this season by hosting a pumpkin-decorating contest, costume contest, and senior trick-or-treating.

Every year Student Council hosts a pumpkin-decorating contest. The contest allowed homerooms to show off their creative side by painting pumpkins. The pumpkins are judged by teachers who come down and decide which pumpkin is the best.

“I enjoyed being a judge for the contest,” said Hillwig. “It’s cool to see how creative the students can be.”

Homeroom 301 (Art) won the contest with their Oscar the Grouch-themed pumpkin. The homeroom was rewarded with a breakfast provided by Student Council. The breakfast includes bagels, doughnuts, and fruit.

The Art Homeroom Oscar the Grouch Pumpkin

“All the pumpkins were so unique,” said Claire Kriner (11). “I never would have thought to paint a pumpkin like they were.”

At the end of the day, Student Council members will dress up in Halloween costumes and deliver the pumpkins to local nursing homes, including Shook Home and Menno Haven.

“My favorite part of the pumpkin-decorating is visiting with the elderly and seeing how happy their reactions are,” said Kriner.

The next event Student Council planned was the costume contest. The costume contest lets students dress up as something of their choosing. The categories were: Most Creative, Best Couple, Best Group, Scariest, and the Most Funny. Student Council then chooses a random selection of teachers to judge the contest. The pumpkins this year were judged by Troy Hillwig (Faculty) and De-bra Blair (Faculty).

“The judging was tough,” said Hillwig. “There were some great costumes like Bonnie and Clyde and Raining Men.”

Dressing up as Bonnie and Clyde, Jackie Wagaman (12) and Aaron Stone (12) pose for a picture.

The final event to wrap the Halloween festivities up was senior Trick-or-Treating. The event enables seniors to dress up in costumes and go around to teachers who give out candy. Not only do the students dress up, but the teachers participate as well to get into the Halloween spirit.

Dressing up as Captain America Brian Stull (Faculty) participates in Senior Trick-or-Treating.

“My favorite thing is senior Trick-or-Treating because students are acting like they are younger again,” said Lynn Fleury-Adamek (Faculty).

From dressing up to getting lots of sweets, the day was filled with Halloween fun for students and faculty to enjoy.

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Paint Party: Pumpkin Edition

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Paint Party: Pumpkin Edition

To add to the peacock on her pumpkin, Trinity Myers (12) adds feathers to emphasize the birds most noticeable trait.

To add to the peacock on her pumpkin, Trinity Myers (12) adds feathers to emphasize the birds most noticeable trait.

To add to the peacock on her pumpkin, Trinity Myers (12) adds feathers to emphasize the birds most noticeable trait.

To add to the peacock on her pumpkin, Trinity Myers (12) adds feathers to emphasize the birds most noticeable trait.

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A chilly autumn breeze blows an ombre of orange, red, and yellow leaves across the grass. Anywhere you go, you are bound to smell a mixture of cinnamon and pumpkin. Porches are decorated with scarecrows, leaves, and pumpkins just waiting to be decorating. Following along with the seasons holidays and traditions, James Buchanan’s Art Club gathered up pumpkins to decorate for fall.

 

Club members got together to decorate pumpkins after school on Thursday, Oct. 25. Some members did a classic jack o’lantern face, while some others branched out to do anything from a monogram of their initials to a peacock with feathers.

For a while, the Art Club has not done any parties that have to do with making art; the events have usually been

While Maggie Strawoet (12) shares a laugh with members of her table, Lizzie Pittman (12) centers her attention on painting her monogram on her pumpkin.

centered around food and activities, such as Secret Santa or tea parties. This year, however, the club is trying to change that.

 

“Normally, our regular Halloween parties are just a breakfast during Activity Period,” said Vice President Maggie Strawoet (12), “so we wanted to do something more elaborate and artsy since this year we are really trying to change up Art Club and do more art instead of just parties.”

The Art Club advisor, Mrs. Kayla Chambers-Matulevich (Faculty), really wants the members’ creations to do more for the school. Whether it is made with a group or individually, Chambers-Matulevich thinks that art should be able to hang around the school and make a lasting impact. To do this, the club needs to step out of its old habits of throwing parties centered around socializing.

 

“Art club should make art. We should be making art, not wasting time. It’s not a socialization club, it’s an art club,” said Chambers-Matulevich.

 

While getting more art out into the school is a main goal of the club, they also hope to raise community awareness of the art being created inside room 305.

As Olivia Harmon (12) paints a haunted house against a nights sky on her pumpkin, she shares a laugh with Amber Clark (12) who paints a scary face on her pumpkin.

“We want to host paint nights for everyone to come, not just for the school, but [for] the community,” said President Lizzie Pittman (12). “Also, we want to do something at the Mercersburg tree lighting ceremony to get the little kids involved.”

 

Taking their first step towards this new goal for themselves, the members have taken to decorating pumpkins. Whether they painted something scary or sweet, or if they used different 3D elements to enhance their designs, the members put their own spin on their pumpkins.

 

“I made a peacock pumpkin,” said Trinity Myers (12). “I thought it would be really fun to use blues and greens. I actually put feathers in the back to make a tail, because peacocks have big tails. Then,…I made a beak out of orange

paper.”

 

With a new aspiration and a motivation to get there, James Buchanan’s Art Club is working towards becoming more involved with supplying art to the school and community.

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Are You College-Ready?

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Are You College-Ready?

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It’s crunch time for the Class of 2019. Many seniors are in the midst of completing college applications toward their next step in education for the start of 2019-2020 school year. To lend a helping hand, James Buchanan’s College Ambassadors have organized workshops to help with any unanswered questions that students might have.

 

The first two workshops focused on the important topics of the FAFSA and The Common Application, which can both be crucial steps when applying to colleges.

 

“The college application process can be quite overwhelming,” said College Ambassador, Harley Rife (12). “These workshops don’t just provide answers to specific questions, but they also allow seniors to see how they can make the process less overwhelming.”

 

Ambassadors were split up into four groups to collect information and study up on various topics that they then would present to college-bound members of the student body.

 

“My group’s topic was on writing admissions essays, and I have learned a lot about what to write about and what colleges are looking for,” says Rife.

 

The student-to-student perspective is a change from just the average meetings with your assigned guidance counselor. This experience gives students a chance to interact with other classmates who can relate since they are going through the same process.

 

“Sometimes with the counselors, students feel like they have to ask questions, or that they have to take extra time from their school day to ask one simple question,” said Rife, ”So students are encouraged to ask College Ambassadors and other students their questions.”

 

The counselors, Mrs. Brenda Ford (Faculty), Mrs. Lynn Troutman (Faculty) and College Advisor Ms. Amy Violante (Faculty) help guide the ambassadors in the right direction to help other students.

 

“The support of Mrs. Troutman and Ms. Violante really motivated me,” said Rife. “So now we’re trying to spread the motivation.”

 

The final workshop will take place in Room 101 on Nov. 2 and will discuss interview and acceptance processes.

 

“I hope students gain knowledge of the topics, but, more importantly, encouragement,” says Rife. “Encouragement to do their best and try their best on all of their essays and applications.”

 

As time starts winding down to the beginning of the 2019 school year, the numerous applications and SAT’s will show their significance in the college application process.

 

“Everyone is capable,” says Rife. “It’s just a matter of putting in the time and getting the ball rolling.”

Emma Gipe, Staff

Emma Gipe is 17 years old and a junior at James Buchanan. Dance is her passion, and she does Jazz, Ballet, Lyrical, Pointe, and Tap.  She also serves...

How Do You Like That AppleFest?

Vendors+are+set+up+along+the+square+of+Chambersburg+for+Applefest.
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How Do You Like That AppleFest?

Vendors are set up along the square of Chambersburg for Applefest.

Vendors are set up along the square of Chambersburg for Applefest.

Vendors are set up along the square of Chambersburg for Applefest.

Vendors are set up along the square of Chambersburg for Applefest.

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On October 20, The Downtown Business Council had their annual Chambersburg AppleFest.  AppleFest is a family tradition with lots of entertainment, crafts, and food vendors. The festival lasted from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. on Saturday.  The event is free and has many activities for the whole family. The Festival covered around six blocks of downtown Chambersburg with over 180 vendors.

Tony Diehl sells Denim Coffee at the Chambersburg Applefest.

“When we found out we could put a table outside and serve right in the community we jumped on it and we are happy to be out here! ” said Tony Diehl from Denim Coffee.

Denim Coffee is a roaster based in Shippensburg that is taking over C&C Coffee on the square of Chambersburg.  Many businesses use the AppleFest as a way to get out in the community and promote their products.

This is the case for Angela Martin, a first-year vendor at the Chambersburg AppleFest with her business Amenity Therapeutic Herbal Wraps.  

Angela Martin sets up her booth at the Chambersburg Applefest.

 “It’s going wonderful, I’ve been so busy this morning I haven’t had a chance to eat my lunch … I’ve always visited this Festival and then I started my own business in 2015 and I thought it would be fun to come sell my product,” said Angela.

Some of our own teachers were at the AppleFest, some would say it was a “JB reunion.”  James Buchanan Faculty Ms. Amy Violante, Mrs. Lynn Troutman, and Ms. Amanda Kuchinski were at the Apple Festival with their families and friends.  Watching the Mar-Le-Nie dance performance was a hit with the James Buchanan Faculty because Troutman’s daughter, Claira, performed.

Amy Violante (faculty) left, (Dietrich Troutman), Lynn Troutman (faculty), and Claria Troutman sit in the food court at the Chambersburg Applefest.

The food vendors were another big hit with the festival. “I’m coming back later today with my mom and I hope we’ll go to the Falafel Shack vendor… it’s my favorite restaurant.” said Violante.

Along with the Faculty, there were also many students from James Buchanan at the Applefest.  Mallory Peck (11) and Madison White (11) were just two of the many students participating in the Apple Festival.

“The AppleFest is tons of fun, it’s a family bonding experience,” Peck (11) said.  

Mallory Peck (11) enjoys a apple cider slushie at the Chambersburg Applefest.

  She has been going for many years and would even consider it a family tradition.  Peck enjoys walking around and looking at all the different products people are selling.  

Next October, put AppleFest in your calendar for a memorable experience.

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