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The Benefits of AP Testing

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As the school year comes to an end, most students are preparing for finals. Many students in Advanced Placement classes, though, are preparing to take one or more of the AP exams offered by the school. While taking advanced classes can be challenging, it has its benefits.

 

AP classes can be easily compared to introductory college classes. Princeton Magazine says,“They [AP classes] are fast-paced, cover more material than regular classes, and require independent work like research and analysis.”

 

By having high school courses comparable to introductory college courses, it can help students with the transition from high school to college work.

 

When colleges look at the AP courses you took in high school, they see that you have the ability to take college courses and that you have what it takes to be in an undergraduate setting.  

 

“When admissions officers see “AP” on your transcript, they know that what you experienced in a particular class has prepared you well for the challenges of college,” says “Work Toward College Success” by the College Board.

 

AP courses not only help your transition into college, but also can help you get college credit. Standing out in a college application can give you a better chance of getting accepted into that college, and also make you stand out more for academic scholarships. “Most colleges and universities nationwide offer college credit… for qualifying AP Exam scores,” says “Discover the Benefits of AP” by the College Board.

 

The AP test scores range from one to five, with five being the highest score; colleges will accept a minimum score for it to transfer to a college class. This means that if your college accepts your score, you can test out of a college class. College courses can cost thousands of dollars, not including books, but if you take and pass the AP test, you’re only spending $93, which saves money compared to the cost of college course credits.

 

While AP courses can seem very stressful, and include a lot of school and homework, taking AP courses offers a lot more to students than general courses can. They can test out of college courses, as well as better prepare them for their college workload.

Abby Carbaugh, Staff

Abby Carbaugh is 17 years old as well as a senior at James Buchanan High School. This is her first year on the Student Media staff, and she is very excited...

Singing, Dancing, and Vanilla Ice Cream – Oh My!

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She Loves Me
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Inventing the Future: One Mouse Caddy at a Time

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Inventing the Future: One Mouse Caddy at a Time

Maggie Strawoet (12) and Jade Wolfe (11) stand by their table presenting their invention at one of the competitions.

Maggie Strawoet (12) and Jade Wolfe (11) stand by their table presenting their invention at one of the competitions.

Erin Martin

Maggie Strawoet (12) and Jade Wolfe (11) stand by their table presenting their invention at one of the competitions.

Erin Martin

Erin Martin

Maggie Strawoet (12) and Jade Wolfe (11) stand by their table presenting their invention at one of the competitions.

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Students from Mrs. Erin Martin’s (Faculty) classes have put their brains together to hatch up a plan for an invention. They will then compete in a competition for entrepreneurship and inventions. During these competitions, many different ideas and inventions are competed for a prize. The “Mouse Caddy” has gotten Jade Wolfe (11) and Maggie Strawoet (12) through many rounds of judges and more to come.

 

“We created the Mouse Caddy, which is a device that attaches to the backside of your laptop screen to hold your cordless mouse,” said Strawoet.

 

Their invention has been exhibited at a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) Competition in New Oxford, PA. Also, Wolfe and Strawoet put together a business plan which explains its purpose and expenses of the Mouse Caddy. The business plan has gotten through the first step at Lock Haven and will be sent higher up to state-level.

 

“We started brainstorming idea for our product and beginning the planning period around the end of September,” said Wolfe. “We really started to focus on designing and building since November and have continued to work on it since then.”

 

The work that goes into this project reflects the students’ creativity and how to make their ideas come to life. Students had to not only invent their creation but also formally express it and put it into words.

 

“We have created 2 display boards, a PowerPoint, a video or commercial, and a 1,000 word paper,” said Strawoet. “We also created multiple prototypes of our Mouse Caddy out of silicon, thermoplastic, and a 3D printer.”

 

Erin Martin

 

A panel of judges then grades the invention which determines if it advances on to the next level in any of the competitions.

 

“It depends on what competition it is, but usually the judges grade us off of some type of rubric,” said Wolfe.

 

On top of impressing the judges, they also face the competition from students from other schools that compete with their inventions. It gives them a chance to see what they are competing against, and what other cool inventions are being created.

 

“My favorite I’ve seen would have to be this magic mirror a group did,” said Strawoet. “It was basically a smart mirror because it had the time and the weather and all these cool features.”

 

Putting their heads together has helped them improve and continue to get better as they attend more and more competitions to compete with their inventions.

 

“Jade and I also have been able to work very well as a team. We know our deadlines and when things need to get done, we get it done,” said Strawoet. “We have worked well together throughout these competitions. We know each other’s strengths and weaknesses and that is something that will help us win these competitions.”

 

By using their skills to work together and successfully present their ideas to judges, these competitions have given the students plenty of opportunities to open up and get out of their comfort zone.

 

“I’ve really learned public speaking and also problem solving,” said Wolfe.

All the way since September, Strawoet and Wolfe have perfected their prototypes and ideas, but what is the end result? What is in it for them?

 

“Prizes depend on the competition we’re going to. Some are Amazon gift cards, and some are just money,” said Strawoet. “Normally there is some type of trophy or plaque”.

 

Wolfe and Strawoet are using their skills to continue competing in various other competitions. On March 28 and 29, Wolfe and Strawoet travel to Bloomsburg and then the State College.

 

They also have the opportunity to go to Harrisburg to the State Capitol where they will just present their products and try to sell them. Wolfe and Strawoet will continue to compete with the Mouse Caddy at many other competitions in the future.

 

Emma Gipe, Staff

Emma Gipe is 17 years old and a junior at James Buchanan. Dance is her passion, and she does Jazz, Ballet, Lyrical, Pointe, and Tap.  She also serves...

Go See She Loves Me This Weekend!

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Go See She Loves Me This Weekend!

Emily Palmerchuck in She Loves Me

Emily Palmerchuck in She Loves Me

Hannah Zomak

Emily Palmerchuck in She Loves Me

Hannah Zomak

Hannah Zomak

Emily Palmerchuck in She Loves Me

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Hannah Zomak, Editor

Hannah Zomak is 18 years old and this is her third year on the James Buchanan Student Media staff.  She feels lucky to be an editor of the yearbook and...

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Ag Olympics Get Students and Faculty MOOving

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Ag Olympics Get Students and Faculty MOOving

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From blue and gold day to kissing cows, the FFA had a very eventful week. As the week went on with different dress up days they all led to the big event that everyone looked forward to: The Ag Olympics. This photo gallery gives and inside look of what happens when cows and hay bales are involved. Students and faculty participate in various events to test their strength and determination to beat the other teams. This (sometimes) friendly event gets the student body on their toes to see which teacher raised the most money and will kiss the cow and who will win the Ag Olympics.

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Eliminating Fear With Steps of Hope

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Eliminating Fear With Steps of Hope

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In a small community, a large number of people are impacted by cancer. Whether it is themselves who are affected or the people around them, many lives are changed by the disease. To support the many people in our small town who have been challenged by the trials of cancer, the community gathered at the Mercersburg Academy on Feb. 17, 2019, from 1-7 P.M. to participate in the Relay for Life.

 

The Relay for Life is a fundraiser done in communities to benefit the American Cancer Society. The event should last

To start off Relay for Life, survivors and current fighters of cancer walked the first lap.

from 6-24 hours, and everyone is asked to walk laps around the track the whole time, signifying how cancer never sleeps.

 

Many people relay for personal reasons. The event allows them to have a time where they can share their experiences with people who have similar experiences.

 

“I relay for my grandma who is currently battling ovarian cancer and is hopefully in remission; my mom who had cervical cancer, and my brother’s dad who died from leukemia,” said Shaelyn Kaiser (12).

 

For other students, instead of walking, they preferred a behind the scenes approach with setting up relay.

 

“Our motivation was that most of our friends and family members were affected by cancer,” said Alexis Keith (12). “We just thought it was a good idea to raise money for them.”

 

Throughout Relay, there were many events that took place. Many of them were light-hearted, such as Zumba, Minute-

At Relay for Life, there were many activities throughout the event. During one lap, Seniors Shaelyn Kaiser, Olivia Harmon, Lindsay Ambrisco, Cass Martin, and Maggie Strawoet did Zumba.

to-Win-It, sending people to jail, and rounds were people born in each decade would take a lap. While there were fun events, there were also serious ones that led the focus to the real reason everyone was there: eliminating cancer.

 

The event opened with Mr. Doug Hoffman telling the crowd about his past experience with cancer, and his current experience. As the event continued, many people bought luminaries for their loved ones who have suffered or fallen to cancer. In the middle of the event, the Luminaria Ceremony began.

 

As the crowd stood in the dark, the speaker read a poem about cancer being like a birthday cake with twelve candles, each one representing a month that was spent without their loved one. As each month was read, a luminaria was lit. At the end of the speech, everyone was encouraged to go light their loved ones luminaria. After the room was lit up by the array of luminaries, the attendees took silent laps around the track in honor of all of the people afflicted by the deadly disease.

 

Relay inspired hope, but one of its purposes was to raise money to donate to cancer research. James Buchanan High School decided to raise money through a Mr. Relay Pageant, where the school’s boys went through comical pageant events.

 

“The pageant was our way to raise the money. We ended [up] raising a lot more than we expected to,” said Keith.

 

At the end of the Relay week, the pageant raised approximately $800 and the actual Relay for Life over $28,000, with donations still coming in, that was given to the American Cancer Society.

 

With many people being diagnosed and affected by cancer every day, our community took Relay for Life by the reigns and raised money to abolish the disease for once and for all.

Intramurals

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Intramurals

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Something new offered to James Buchanan last year by Mrs. Breanna Grove (Faculty) was the aspect of intramural sports. In these sports, students form their own teams and compete during Activity Period twice a week. They compete in “tournament-style” games where their team is placed in a bracket; the team who wins the most games wins the tournament.

 

The Intramural sports offered have been limited to dodgeball currently, but Grove plans to expand in the future.

Logan Knable (12) prepares to throw a dodgeball at the opposing team while team member, Junior Tomasello (10), tries to catch a thrown ball.

“Whenever I was getting interviewed for this position, I brought up the idea of intramurals, so we wanted to try it here,” said Grove.

 

When Grove was hired, she wanted every student in James Buchanan, no matter the athletic ability, to have the opportunity to participate in a school sport and be active. At the schools where she student-taught, they played intramurals there and she wanted to try something new at James Buchanan.

 

“They [intramurals] are more students who want to participate in sports, but not varsity sports,” said Grove.

 

Intramurals aren’t as much of a commitment as varsity sports are. As well as only being twice a week during school hours, they also are no-cut sports. By having no cuts, it relieves the students of stress they may have for trying out for the sports. Students don’t have to worry about making a team as they are already guaranteed to be a participant if they turn in their team form before the sport starts.

 

“I really like that we can form our own teams with friends and play against other students in our school,” said Lizzie Pittman (12).

 

Intramural sports also takes away the competitive aspect that varsity sports have. They allow students to play amongst their peers and form their own teams, making the sports less competitive and makes it more enjoyable for all of the students.

 

“Even if you don’t want to play, we allow students to come in the gym and watch,” said Grove.

Hunter Dysinger (11) gets ready to to throw a dodgeball at opposing team member, Kolby Daley (11).

Anybody can come down and watch their peers play Intramurals. The students cheer and encourage the teams, making it more enjoyable for the players.

 

“When other schools do Intramurals they get a good response from them,” said Grove.

 

The Intramurals at James Buchanan have so far received a good response whether they be from the player or spectators. Grove hopes to continue doing more intramurals in the future as well as broadening the sports offered.

 

Abby Carbaugh, Staff

Abby Carbaugh is 17 years old as well as a senior at James Buchanan High School. This is her first year on the Student Media staff, and she is very excited...

Filed under On Campus, Showcase

A Winter Wonderland

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A Winter Wonderland

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On Saturday, Feb. 9 James Buchanan hosted their annual Winter Dance from 7 to 10 p.m. Student Council is the organization responsible for the event, they also organize and plan all the other dances throughout the year. This year, they combined the Winter Dance and the Valentine’s Day Dance with a theme of Winter Wonderland.

“My favorite part about the dance is the theme,” said Taylor Piper (10).

With the theme being Winter Wonderland, Student Council hung light decorations and backdrops with a Winter theme, They also incorporated Valentine’s Day into it as well, using roses and hearts decorations.

“I think Student Council enjoys having fun and being together while they’re working together,” said Mrs. Ann Fitz (Faculty).

Student Council starts preparing for the dance early that morning at 9 a.m. until the students start crowding in that night.

With Student Council being responsible for the dance, it makes them accountable for things like the decorations, selling tickets, the DJ, and making sure there is student participation

“It gives the student body a wholesome opportunity to be together and have fun outside of school hours,” says Fitz.

SInging, Taylor Piper (10), Brianna Cole (10), and Breanna Dukehart (11) lead the crowd

While the participation isn’t as teeming with students like Homecoming or Prom, it is a dance for students to come and enjoy the night together.

The dance started at 7 p.m. and as the doors opened, students created a very prolonged line to enter the cafeteria, where the dance occurred. After a little while, all of the students in various grades were found dancing together in the middle of the floor.

The DJ also included himself in the night with interacting with the students. He picked out a handful of kids and gave them props to play a little game while dancing with everyone. Continuously talking to the student body trying to get them more rowdied up.

While dancing, students gather for a quick picture.

Many students seemed to enjoy the dance and all the people in it. It was a night for everyone to get dressed up and come together for an event.

Julia Trei, Staff

Julia Trei is 15-years old and a sophomore at James Buchanan High School. Her hobbies include running and shopping. Her favorite color is yellow and her...

Can You Feel the Love Tonight?

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Can You Feel the Love Tonight?

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February is the time of love thanks to Valentine’s Day. There’s another type of love in the air at James Buchanan High School—the love of music.

Planning for the Rocket Band’s “I Love Music” concert starts as far back as November at the end of marching season. Students received a selection of music, which was narrowed down as the concert approached. Even though the Band works on the music every day from the end of marching season, the band director, Mrs. Sheryl Deike (Faculty), chose to fill the February concert with easy music because it runs the risk of being snowed out and cancelled.

“My February concert is different from my May concert,” said Deike. “My February concert, if it gets snowed out, you know, I don’t want to put a lot of time and effort into music that we don’t get to play.”

Carly Ashway (11), Ashley Grove (12), and Nathan Walls (12) hold out a low note during “The Pacific.”

The February 14, 2019 “I Love Music” concert had a total of four songs, all of which came from a movie, musical, or TV show. The concert opened with a medley of songs from The Lion King, including “Circle of Life,” “I Just Can’t Wait to Be King,” “Hakuna Matata,” and “Can You Feel the Love Tonight?”

“I try to pick things that we kind of enjoy playing, nothing really heavy that’s fun and enjoyable for the crowd that comes out,” Deike said.

The crowd is something Deike always takes into account when choosing music. She doesn’t choose classical pieces that are so “off the wall” that the audience wouldn’t recognize them or enjoy it, hence the inclusion of The Lion King.

“I ask the seniors if there’s a song they would like to bring back,” said Deike, “or a couple songs that they would like to bring back, kind of like their finale.”

Jacob Troupe (11) and Dylan Parker (9) pause during a measure of rest.

“Selections from Phantom of the Opera” (dubbed “Phantom” for short by the band) is another piece loved by the Band. It was also the song that the graduating class of 2019 chose to bring back. It serves as a swan song of sorts, a callback to their time as sophomores, when they last performed it. The piece, like “Lion King” is a medley of songs from the musical, The Phantom of the Opera. It included the titular number and the famous scream when the Phantom removes his mask, this year performed by Zach Slodysko (11).

“It was exhilarating,” said Slodysko when asked what it was like doing the scream. “I felt like a little kid again.”

Bringing back childhood memories with medlies such as “The Lion King” and “How to Train Your Dragon,” as well as high school memories for upperclassmen with “Phantom,” the band gave a lovely performance at their February concert, despite being at a disadvantage due to two snow days prior to the performance.

Deanna Grove, Staff

Deanna Grove is a senior at James Buchanan High School. This is her first year as part of the JB Student Media staff, and she's always busy taking part...

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$10, 621,683.76 Raised

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Shay Fisher, Staff

Shay Fisher is a senior at James Buchanan High School. In her free time, she enjoys running for JB's Cross Country team. Shay also participates in several...

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Circle Up to Gamify: English class takes on Classcraft

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Circle Up to Gamify: English class takes on Classcraft

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English 10 teachers Ms. Kelley Reeder and Ms. Nicole Myers explore the world of gamification in their Keystone English class to spice up the literature circle unit and bring some engagement and competition in for their students.

Hannah Zomak, Editor

Hannah Zomak is 18 years old and this is her third year on the James Buchanan Student Media staff.  She feels lucky to be an editor of the yearbook and...

Hannah Kimmel, Editor

Hannah is a Junior, this is her second year in yearbook. She is captain of the girls varsity soccer team and is on the basketball team. She is also the...

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Coding vs. Programming: What’s The Difference?

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Coding vs. Programming: What’s The Difference?

Showing him something on the computer, Mr. Brooks (Faculty) teaches Ty Robinson (10) a new concept.

Showing him something on the computer, Mr. Brooks (Faculty) teaches Ty Robinson (10) a new concept.

Showing him something on the computer, Mr. Brooks (Faculty) teaches Ty Robinson (10) a new concept.

Showing him something on the computer, Mr. Brooks (Faculty) teaches Ty Robinson (10) a new concept.

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The two computer terms, coding and programming, are words that we often use interchangeably without giving it much thought. Yes, they are correlated with each other but we rarely dive in deep to what each individual word truly means. Simple tasks such as setting your alarm clock, changing the radio station, or pressing the buttons on a microwave could lead to something even bigger in the immense world of technology. Writing code is only the start of creating software, and programming is where the process becomes extremely complex.

    

    The action of writing code is simply telling the computer what to do and how to function. Programming is putting all that information together and putting it to use.

 

    “Coding would be writing individual lines of information on a computer,” said Mr. Bill Brooks (Faculty), “and when it’s all compiled together, it creates one large program.”

 

   Although they sound similar, the jobs of coders and programmers are two vastly different things. The job of a coder is at a much more intermediate level than that of a programmer. It involves writing singular lines of code, while translating the computer language to the language you and I speak.

 

    “When you are coding, you are truly writing the code that maybe the everyday person wouldn’t understand,” said Mrs. Erin Martin (Faculty).

 

As for the job of the programmer, it requires a more advanced skillset. A programmer makes sure a machine or application runs efficiently without any mistakes. Making sure there are no errors is crucial to the machine correctly running as one large program. Making an error can ruin all of the computer coding that has already been done. The coding has to already be complete so that the programmer’s job can begin.

 

    “Before the programming can be done, somebody had to code it kind of in the background,” said Martin.

Working hard, Joshua Frey (10) sets up a code for his program.

    At James Buchanan High School, there is a computer science class offered that is taught by Brooks. During class, his students learn about the basic outline of coding and put it into practice. Brooks then teaches his students about compiling the codes together to make one large program. This program, if done correctly, would allow a machine to work effectively.

 

    “We write a lot of codes to make the program run correctly,” said Brooks talking about what activities happen daily, in his computer science class.

 

    Striving for greatness, the teachers in the technology education department hope to see a dramatic advance in the computer knowledge of students. As time passes, they feel that the coding and programming that is usually done behind the scenes, will start to be done by the consumers themselves.

 

    “Just like, years ago, we used to hire people to do typing. Now everybody does their own typing,” said Brooks, “Presently, we hire people to code, but in the future, people are going to start writing their own codes to make programs do what they want for their unique application.”

 

    If you have ever heard of the two terms, the line between coding and programming has always been blurred by assumption that they mean the same thing. The teachers of the technology education department, Mr. Brooks and Mrs. Martin, have been trying to teach their students the vast difference so that they may be able to do it on their own someday. They hope for the computer-based knowledge in the teenagers they teach to expand greatly as they learn more and more concepts.

Eva Dempsey, Staff

Eva Dempsey is 15-years old and she is in her sophomore year at James Buchanan High School. Her favorite color is yellow and her favorite food is pizza....

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  • The Benefits of AP Testing

    Entertainment

    Singing, Dancing, and Vanilla Ice Cream – Oh My!

  • The Benefits of AP Testing

    On Campus

    Inventing the Future: One Mouse Caddy at a Time

  • The Benefits of AP Testing

    Entertainment

    Go See She Loves Me This Weekend!

  • The Benefits of AP Testing

    On Campus

    Ag Olympics Get Students and Faculty MOOving

  • The Benefits of AP Testing

    On Campus

    Intramurals

  • The Benefits of AP Testing

    On Campus

    A Winter Wonderland

  • The Benefits of AP Testing

    Entertainment

    Can You Feel the Love Tonight?

  • The Benefits of AP Testing

    On Campus

    Circle Up to Gamify: English class takes on Classcraft

  • The Benefits of AP Testing

    News

    Coding vs. Programming: What’s The Difference?

  • The Benefits of AP Testing

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