The Rocket Flame

The Benefits of AP Testing

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






As the school year comes to an end, most students are preparing for finals. Many students in Advanced Placement classes, though, are preparing to take one or more of the AP exams offered by the school. While taking advanced classes can be challenging, it has its benefits.

 

AP classes can be easily compared to introductory college classes. Princeton Magazine says,“They [AP classes] are fast-paced, cover more material than regular classes, and require independent work like research and analysis.”

 

By having high school courses comparable to introductory college courses, it can help students with the transition from high school to college work.

 

When colleges look at the AP courses you took in high school, they see that you have the ability to take college courses and that you have what it takes to be in an undergraduate setting.  

 

“When admissions officers see “AP” on your transcript, they know that what you experienced in a particular class has prepared you well for the challenges of college,” says “Work Toward College Success” by the College Board.

 

AP courses not only help your transition into college, but also can help you get college credit. Standing out in a college application can give you a better chance of getting accepted into that college, and also make you stand out more for academic scholarships. “Most colleges and universities nationwide offer college credit… for qualifying AP Exam scores,” says “Discover the Benefits of AP” by the College Board.

 

The AP test scores range from one to five, with five being the highest score; colleges will accept a minimum score for it to transfer to a college class. This means that if your college accepts your score, you can test out of a college class. College courses can cost thousands of dollars, not including books, but if you take and pass the AP test, you’re only spending $93, which saves money compared to the cost of college course credits.

 

While AP courses can seem very stressful, and include a lot of school and homework, taking AP courses offers a lot more to students than general courses can. They can test out of college courses, as well as better prepare them for their college workload.

Abby Carbaugh, Staff

Abby Carbaugh is 17 years old as well as a senior at James Buchanan High School. This is her first year on the Student Media staff, and she is very excited...

Singing, Dancing, and Vanilla Ice Cream – Oh My!

Back to Article
Back to Article

Singing, Dancing, and Vanilla Ice Cream – Oh My!

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






She Loves Me
Filed under On Campus, Showcase

Inventing the Future: One Mouse Caddy at a Time

Maggie+Strawoet+%2812%29+and+Jade+Wolfe+%2811%29+stand+by+their+table+presenting+their+invention+at+one+of+the+competitions.+
Back to Article
Back to Article

Inventing the Future: One Mouse Caddy at a Time

Maggie Strawoet (12) and Jade Wolfe (11) stand by their table presenting their invention at one of the competitions.

Maggie Strawoet (12) and Jade Wolfe (11) stand by their table presenting their invention at one of the competitions.

Erin Martin

Maggie Strawoet (12) and Jade Wolfe (11) stand by their table presenting their invention at one of the competitions.

Erin Martin

Erin Martin

Maggie Strawoet (12) and Jade Wolfe (11) stand by their table presenting their invention at one of the competitions.

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Students from Mrs. Erin Martin’s (Faculty) classes have put their brains together to hatch up a plan for an invention. They will then compete in a competition for entrepreneurship and inventions. During these competitions, many different ideas and inventions are competed for a prize. The “Mouse Caddy” has gotten Jade Wolfe (11) and Maggie Strawoet (12) through many rounds of judges and more to come.

 

“We created the Mouse Caddy, which is a device that attaches to the backside of your laptop screen to hold your cordless mouse,” said Strawoet.

 

Their invention has been exhibited at a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) Competition in New Oxford, PA. Also, Wolfe and Strawoet put together a business plan which explains its purpose and expenses of the Mouse Caddy. The business plan has gotten through the first step at Lock Haven and will be sent higher up to state-level.

 

“We started brainstorming idea for our product and beginning the planning period around the end of September,” said Wolfe. “We really started to focus on designing and building since November and have continued to work on it since then.”

 

The work that goes into this project reflects the students’ creativity and how to make their ideas come to life. Students had to not only invent their creation but also formally express it and put it into words.

 

“We have created 2 display boards, a PowerPoint, a video or commercial, and a 1,000 word paper,” said Strawoet. “We also created multiple prototypes of our Mouse Caddy out of silicon, thermoplastic, and a 3D printer.”

 

Erin Martin

 

A panel of judges then grades the invention which determines if it advances on to the next level in any of the competitions.

 

“It depends on what competition it is, but usually the judges grade us off of some type of rubric,” said Wolfe.

 

On top of impressing the judges, they also face the competition from students from other schools that compete with their inventions. It gives them a chance to see what they are competing against, and what other cool inventions are being created.

 

“My favorite I’ve seen would have to be this magic mirror a group did,” said Strawoet. “It was basically a smart mirror because it had the time and the weather and all these cool features.”

 

Putting their heads together has helped them improve and continue to get better as they attend more and more competitions to compete with their inventions.

 

“Jade and I also have been able to work very well as a team. We know our deadlines and when things need to get done, we get it done,” said Strawoet. “We have worked well together throughout these competitions. We know each other’s strengths and weaknesses and that is something that will help us win these competitions.”

 

By using their skills to work together and successfully present their ideas to judges, these competitions have given the students plenty of opportunities to open up and get out of their comfort zone.

 

“I’ve really learned public speaking and also problem solving,” said Wolfe.

All the way since September, Strawoet and Wolfe have perfected their prototypes and ideas, but what is the end result? What is in it for them?

 

“Prizes depend on the competition we’re going to. Some are Amazon gift cards, and some are just money,” said Strawoet. “Normally there is some type of trophy or plaque”.

 

Wolfe and Strawoet are using their skills to continue competing in various other competitions. On March 28 and 29, Wolfe and Strawoet travel to Bloomsburg and then the State College.

 

They also have the opportunity to go to Harrisburg to the State Capitol where they will just present their products and try to sell them. Wolfe and Strawoet will continue to compete with the Mouse Caddy at many other competitions in the future.

 

Emma Gipe, Staff

Emma Gipe is 17 years old and a junior at James Buchanan. Dance is her passion, and she does Jazz, Ballet, Lyrical, Pointe, and Tap.  She also serves...

Go See She Loves Me This Weekend!

Emily+Palmerchuck+in+She+Loves+Me
Back to Article
Back to Article

Go See She Loves Me This Weekend!

Emily Palmerchuck in She Loves Me

Emily Palmerchuck in She Loves Me

Hannah Zomak

Emily Palmerchuck in She Loves Me

Hannah Zomak

Hannah Zomak

Emily Palmerchuck in She Loves Me

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Hannah Zomak, Editor

Hannah Zomak is 18 years old and this is her third year on the James Buchanan Student Media staff.  She feels lucky to be an editor of the yearbook and...

Filed under On Campus

Ag Olympics Get Students and Faculty MOOving

Back to Article
Back to Article

Ag Olympics Get Students and Faculty MOOving

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






From blue and gold day to kissing cows, the FFA had a very eventful week. As the week went on with different dress up days they all led to the big event that everyone looked forward to: The Ag Olympics. This photo gallery gives and inside look of what happens when cows and hay bales are involved. Students and faculty participate in various events to test their strength and determination to beat the other teams. This (sometimes) friendly event gets the student body on their toes to see which teacher raised the most money and will kiss the cow and who will win the Ag Olympics.

Intramurals

Back to Article
Back to Article

Intramurals

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Something new offered to James Buchanan last year by Mrs. Breanna Grove (Faculty) was the aspect of intramural sports. In these sports, students form their own teams and compete during Activity Period twice a week. They compete in “tournament-style” games where their team is placed in a bracket; the team who wins the most games wins the tournament.

 

The Intramural sports offered have been limited to dodgeball currently, but Grove plans to expand in the future.

Logan Knable (12) prepares to throw a dodgeball at the opposing team while team member, Junior Tomasello (10), tries to catch a thrown ball.

“Whenever I was getting interviewed for this position, I brought up the idea of intramurals, so we wanted to try it here,” said Grove.

 

When Grove was hired, she wanted every student in James Buchanan, no matter the athletic ability, to have the opportunity to participate in a school sport and be active. At the schools where she student-taught, they played intramurals there and she wanted to try something new at James Buchanan.

 

“They [intramurals] are more students who want to participate in sports, but not varsity sports,” said Grove.

 

Intramurals aren’t as much of a commitment as varsity sports are. As well as only being twice a week during school hours, they also are no-cut sports. By having no cuts, it relieves the students of stress they may have for trying out for the sports. Students don’t have to worry about making a team as they are already guaranteed to be a participant if they turn in their team form before the sport starts.

 

“I really like that we can form our own teams with friends and play against other students in our school,” said Lizzie Pittman (12).

 

Intramural sports also takes away the competitive aspect that varsity sports have. They allow students to play amongst their peers and form their own teams, making the sports less competitive and makes it more enjoyable for all of the students.

 

“Even if you don’t want to play, we allow students to come in the gym and watch,” said Grove.

Hunter Dysinger (11) gets ready to to throw a dodgeball at opposing team member, Kolby Daley (11).

Anybody can come down and watch their peers play Intramurals. The students cheer and encourage the teams, making it more enjoyable for the players.

 

“When other schools do Intramurals they get a good response from them,” said Grove.

 

The Intramurals at James Buchanan have so far received a good response whether they be from the player or spectators. Grove hopes to continue doing more intramurals in the future as well as broadening the sports offered.

 

Abby Carbaugh, Staff

Abby Carbaugh is 17 years old as well as a senior at James Buchanan High School. This is her first year on the Student Media staff, and she is very excited...

Filed under On Campus, Showcase

A Winter Wonderland

Back to Article
Back to Article

A Winter Wonderland

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






On Saturday, Feb. 9 James Buchanan hosted their annual Winter Dance from 7 to 10 p.m. Student Council is the organization responsible for the event, they also organize and plan all the other dances throughout the year. This year, they combined the Winter Dance and the Valentine’s Day Dance with a theme of Winter Wonderland.

“My favorite part about the dance is the theme,” said Taylor Piper (10).

With the theme being Winter Wonderland, Student Council hung light decorations and backdrops with a Winter theme, They also incorporated Valentine’s Day into it as well, using roses and hearts decorations.

“I think Student Council enjoys having fun and being together while they’re working together,” said Mrs. Ann Fitz (Faculty).

Student Council starts preparing for the dance early that morning at 9 a.m. until the students start crowding in that night.

With Student Council being responsible for the dance, it makes them accountable for things like the decorations, selling tickets, the DJ, and making sure there is student participation

“It gives the student body a wholesome opportunity to be together and have fun outside of school hours,” says Fitz.

SInging, Taylor Piper (10), Brianna Cole (10), and Breanna Dukehart (11) lead the crowd

While the participation isn’t as teeming with students like Homecoming or Prom, it is a dance for students to come and enjoy the night together.

The dance started at 7 p.m. and as the doors opened, students created a very prolonged line to enter the cafeteria, where the dance occurred. After a little while, all of the students in various grades were found dancing together in the middle of the floor.

The DJ also included himself in the night with interacting with the students. He picked out a handful of kids and gave them props to play a little game while dancing with everyone. Continuously talking to the student body trying to get them more rowdied up.

While dancing, students gather for a quick picture.

Many students seemed to enjoy the dance and all the people in it. It was a night for everyone to get dressed up and come together for an event.

Julia Trei, Staff

Julia Trei is 15-years old and a sophomore at James Buchanan High School. Her hobbies include running and shopping. Her favorite color is yellow and her...

Can You Feel the Love Tonight?

Back to Article
Back to Article

Can You Feel the Love Tonight?

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






February is the time of love thanks to Valentine’s Day. There’s another type of love in the air at James Buchanan High School—the love of music.

Planning for the Rocket Band’s “I Love Music” concert starts as far back as November at the end of marching season. Students received a selection of music, which was narrowed down as the concert approached. Even though the Band works on the music every day from the end of marching season, the band director, Mrs. Sheryl Deike (Faculty), chose to fill the February concert with easy music because it runs the risk of being snowed out and cancelled.

“My February concert is different from my May concert,” said Deike. “My February concert, if it gets snowed out, you know, I don’t want to put a lot of time and effort into music that we don’t get to play.”

Carly Ashway (11), Ashley Grove (12), and Nathan Walls (12) hold out a low note during “The Pacific.”

The February 14, 2019 “I Love Music” concert had a total of four songs, all of which came from a movie, musical, or TV show. The concert opened with a medley of songs from The Lion King, including “Circle of Life,” “I Just Can’t Wait to Be King,” “Hakuna Matata,” and “Can You Feel the Love Tonight?”

“I try to pick things that we kind of enjoy playing, nothing really heavy that’s fun and enjoyable for the crowd that comes out,” Deike said.

The crowd is something Deike always takes into account when choosing music. She doesn’t choose classical pieces that are so “off the wall” that the audience wouldn’t recognize them or enjoy it, hence the inclusion of The Lion King.

“I ask the seniors if there’s a song they would like to bring back,” said Deike, “or a couple songs that they would like to bring back, kind of like their finale.”

Jacob Troupe (11) and Dylan Parker (9) pause during a measure of rest.

“Selections from Phantom of the Opera” (dubbed “Phantom” for short by the band) is another piece loved by the Band. It was also the song that the graduating class of 2019 chose to bring back. It serves as a swan song of sorts, a callback to their time as sophomores, when they last performed it. The piece, like “Lion King” is a medley of songs from the musical, The Phantom of the Opera. It included the titular number and the famous scream when the Phantom removes his mask, this year performed by Zach Slodysko (11).

“It was exhilarating,” said Slodysko when asked what it was like doing the scream. “I felt like a little kid again.”

Bringing back childhood memories with medlies such as “The Lion King” and “How to Train Your Dragon,” as well as high school memories for upperclassmen with “Phantom,” the band gave a lovely performance at their February concert, despite being at a disadvantage due to two snow days prior to the performance.

Deanna Grove, Staff

Deanna Grove is a senior at James Buchanan High School. This is her first year as part of the JB Student Media staff, and she's always busy taking part...

Filed under On Campus, Showcase, Video

Circle Up to Gamify: English class takes on Classcraft

Back to Article
Back to Article

Circle Up to Gamify: English class takes on Classcraft

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






English 10 teachers Ms. Kelley Reeder and Ms. Nicole Myers explore the world of gamification in their Keystone English class to spice up the literature circle unit and bring some engagement and competition in for their students.

Hannah Zomak, Editor

Hannah Zomak is 18 years old and this is her third year on the James Buchanan Student Media staff.  She feels lucky to be an editor of the yearbook and...

Hannah Kimmel, Editor

Hannah is a Junior, this is her second year in yearbook. She is captain of the girls varsity soccer team and is on the basketball team. She is also the...

Filed under News, On Campus, Showcase

Coding vs. Programming: What’s The Difference?

Showing+him+something+on+the+computer%2C+Mr.+Brooks+%28Faculty%29+teaches+Ty+Robinson+%2810%29+a+new+concept.
Back to Article
Back to Article

Coding vs. Programming: What’s The Difference?

Showing him something on the computer, Mr. Brooks (Faculty) teaches Ty Robinson (10) a new concept.

Showing him something on the computer, Mr. Brooks (Faculty) teaches Ty Robinson (10) a new concept.

Showing him something on the computer, Mr. Brooks (Faculty) teaches Ty Robinson (10) a new concept.

Showing him something on the computer, Mr. Brooks (Faculty) teaches Ty Robinson (10) a new concept.

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






The two computer terms, coding and programming, are words that we often use interchangeably without giving it much thought. Yes, they are correlated with each other but we rarely dive in deep to what each individual word truly means. Simple tasks such as setting your alarm clock, changing the radio station, or pressing the buttons on a microwave could lead to something even bigger in the immense world of technology. Writing code is only the start of creating software, and programming is where the process becomes extremely complex.

    

    The action of writing code is simply telling the computer what to do and how to function. Programming is putting all that information together and putting it to use.

 

    “Coding would be writing individual lines of information on a computer,” said Mr. Bill Brooks (Faculty), “and when it’s all compiled together, it creates one large program.”

 

   Although they sound similar, the jobs of coders and programmers are two vastly different things. The job of a coder is at a much more intermediate level than that of a programmer. It involves writing singular lines of code, while translating the computer language to the language you and I speak.

 

    “When you are coding, you are truly writing the code that maybe the everyday person wouldn’t understand,” said Mrs. Erin Martin (Faculty).

 

As for the job of the programmer, it requires a more advanced skillset. A programmer makes sure a machine or application runs efficiently without any mistakes. Making sure there are no errors is crucial to the machine correctly running as one large program. Making an error can ruin all of the computer coding that has already been done. The coding has to already be complete so that the programmer’s job can begin.

 

    “Before the programming can be done, somebody had to code it kind of in the background,” said Martin.

Working hard, Joshua Frey (10) sets up a code for his program.

    At James Buchanan High School, there is a computer science class offered that is taught by Brooks. During class, his students learn about the basic outline of coding and put it into practice. Brooks then teaches his students about compiling the codes together to make one large program. This program, if done correctly, would allow a machine to work effectively.

 

    “We write a lot of codes to make the program run correctly,” said Brooks talking about what activities happen daily, in his computer science class.

 

    Striving for greatness, the teachers in the technology education department hope to see a dramatic advance in the computer knowledge of students. As time passes, they feel that the coding and programming that is usually done behind the scenes, will start to be done by the consumers themselves.

 

    “Just like, years ago, we used to hire people to do typing. Now everybody does their own typing,” said Brooks, “Presently, we hire people to code, but in the future, people are going to start writing their own codes to make programs do what they want for their unique application.”

 

    If you have ever heard of the two terms, the line between coding and programming has always been blurred by assumption that they mean the same thing. The teachers of the technology education department, Mr. Brooks and Mrs. Martin, have been trying to teach their students the vast difference so that they may be able to do it on their own someday. They hope for the computer-based knowledge in the teenagers they teach to expand greatly as they learn more and more concepts.

Eva Dempsey, Staff

Eva Dempsey is 15-years old and she is in her sophomore year at James Buchanan High School. Her favorite color is yellow and her favorite food is pizza....

Filed under On Campus, Showcase

Explore Your Major

Back to Article
Back to Article

Explore Your Major

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






On January 23, the JBHS College Ambassadors held their first Major Exploration Day.  Throughout the day the Ambassadors presented PowerPoint presentations and handed out pamphlets to inform students about different college majors and careers they may want to pursue.  Covering twelve different majors from International Studies to Health Sciences, there was information for everyone.

“At one of our weekly meetings the College Ambassadors choose different majors that they wanted to represent,” said Amy Violante (Faculty). “Then they made handouts visuals to share with the other students.”

The goal was to inform the student body about career paths you can choose and the different steps required to get there. Ambassadors were split up into four groups to collect information about careers and study up on various topics that they then would present to the student body.  

Cass Martin and Harley Rife (12) teach Hannah Zomak, Cormac Houpt, and Logan Williams (12) about Health Sciences.

“We had a lot of students come today interested in Nursing and Business,” said Cass Martin (12). “ We gave the students something to take with them so that they could go home and reflect afterward.”

Students came in and out of the library all day to watch the presentations and get the handouts created by the Ambassadors.  Anyone who participated in the Major Exploration Day by asking questions or listening to a presentation received a penate from the college of their choice.  Students were also added into a raffle for a chance to win a speaker or headphones as a prize.

“I really enjoyed getting to learn about my intended major, Animal Science,” said Rose Runyan (12). “Ms. Violante told me about the in-depth requirements and what I must do to achieve that major.”

Visuals shown during the Major Exploration Day showed schooling requirements for the intended careers. If there wasn’t a PowerPoint on a career selected by a student there was a bin full of miscellaneous careers that had information regarding the paths taken to get there.  The Ambassadors felt that they had a successful day with over 70 participants entered in the speaker raffle.

“The morning was a little slow, but thanks to some great study hall advertisement and some teachers who encouraged their student to come, we had a good turn out,” said Violante.

For more college advice and assistance, Ms. Violante will also be holding the next SATTea Time next Friday, February 1 for whoever is interested in registering for the spring SAT.  Also, there will be another FAFSA completion night on February 11 for any seniors who still need help completing financial aid packages.

Aria Jewel-Barnett (12) presents English and Education majors during Major Exploration Day.

Alyssa Blair, Staff

Alyssa Blair is a a first-year member of the James Buchanan Student Media staff.  She is a senior at James Buchanan High School and is very involved. ...

A Royal Night

Back to Article
Back to Article

A Royal Night

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






200 little princesses from four kingdoms—St. Thomas, Montgomery, Mountain View, and Mercersburg—arrived with their royal escorts to a ball held at James Buchanan High School. Little girls from the four elementary schools were accompanied by their fathers at the first daddy-daughter dance hosted by the Rocket Band.

On December 14, the James Buchanan High School band hosted a fundraising event in the form of a dance for girls in elementary school. The mastermind behind the night, band director Mrs. Sheryl Deike (Faculty) said she got the idea for a daddy-daughter dance from her daughter.

“My oldest daughter did it down in Appomattox, Virginia,” said Deike. “They didn’t do any pre-sales, they just advertised it, thinking maybe, you know, twenty or thirty [fathers and daughters would come]. They said the gym was filled.”

Deike did not expect to have the same large turnout as her daughter. By selling tickets ahead of time, Deike expected to have a few more fathers and daughters, but not enough to fill the cafeteria, where the dance was held.

“50, maybe 75 tops,” Deike said. “It came out to 200 hundred kids.”

Using the people at her disposal, Deike enlisted percussion instructor Michael Seville to D.J.

200 daughters meant 200 fathers, the only ones that had to pay for a ticket. The daughters got in free, and dads paid five dollars. In ticket sales alone, the band brought in $1,000, plus what they made from dads buying the snacks and carnations that were for sale. Aside from earning money for music programs, Deike wanted to bring the community together.

“I just wanted to do something sweet for the community,” said Deike. “I thought it was a nice idea.”

Along with having the dance for the community, Deike wanted everyone to see the Band.

“I guess it was a selfish thing, trying to get kids or people coming up to the high school to see us,” said Deike. “We’re not just about making music.”

Kennedy Saunders (9), Dawson Green (12), Sadie Garbinski (9), and Emily Horst (10) hand out punch and pretzels.

The dance was staffed entirely by Band students that volunteered to help out, as well as instructors. Band members ran games for the girls in the band room and played Frozen in the auditorium. Others ran snack tables in the lobby, giving out free punch and pretzels and selling bags of chips, cookies, and candy.

Deike already has plans to hold an event for mothers and sons in the spring. She also plans to hold another daddy-daughter dance next year. According to Deike, the daddy-daughter dance is the band’s “golden nugget.” It’s the special fundraiser they do that’s specific to them, but it also gives little princesses from Tuscarora School District’s four elementary schools a special evening with their fathers.

 

Navigate Left
  • The Benefits of AP Testing

    Entertainment

    Singing, Dancing, and Vanilla Ice Cream – Oh My!

  • The Benefits of AP Testing

    On Campus

    Inventing the Future: One Mouse Caddy at a Time

  • The Benefits of AP Testing

    Entertainment

    Go See She Loves Me This Weekend!

  • The Benefits of AP Testing

    On Campus

    Ag Olympics Get Students and Faculty MOOving

  • The Benefits of AP Testing

    On Campus

    Intramurals

  • The Benefits of AP Testing

    On Campus

    A Winter Wonderland

  • The Benefits of AP Testing

    Entertainment

    Can You Feel the Love Tonight?

  • The Benefits of AP Testing

    On Campus

    Circle Up to Gamify: English class takes on Classcraft

  • The Benefits of AP Testing

    News

    Coding vs. Programming: What’s The Difference?

  • The Benefits of AP Testing

    On Campus

    Explore Your Major

Navigate Right
The Student News Site of James Buchanan High School
On Campus