The Rocket Flame

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Ag Olympics Get Students and Faculty MOOving

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Ag Olympics Get Students and Faculty MOOving

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From blue and gold day to kissing cows, the FFA had a very eventful week. As the week went on with different dress up days they all led to the big event that everyone looked forward to: The Ag Olympics. This photo gallery gives and inside look of what happens when cows and hay bales are involved. Students and faculty participate in various events to test their strength and determination to beat the other teams. This (sometimes) friendly event gets the student body on their toes to see which teacher raised the most money and will kiss the cow and who will win the Ag Olympics.

Filed under News, Off Campus

Eliminating Fear With Steps of Hope

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Eliminating Fear With Steps of Hope

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In a small community, a large number of people are impacted by cancer. Whether it is themselves who are affected or the people around them, many lives are changed by the disease. To support the many people in our small town who have been challenged by the trials of cancer, the community gathered at the Mercersburg Academy on Feb. 17, 2019, from 1-7 P.M. to participate in the Relay for Life.

 

The Relay for Life is a fundraiser done in communities to benefit the American Cancer Society. The event should last

To start off Relay for Life, survivors and current fighters of cancer walked the first lap.

from 6-24 hours, and everyone is asked to walk laps around the track the whole time, signifying how cancer never sleeps.

 

Many people relay for personal reasons. The event allows them to have a time where they can share their experiences with people who have similar experiences.

 

“I relay for my grandma who is currently battling ovarian cancer and is hopefully in remission; my mom who had cervical cancer, and my brother’s dad who died from leukemia,” said Shaelyn Kaiser (12).

 

For other students, instead of walking, they preferred a behind the scenes approach with setting up relay.

 

“Our motivation was that most of our friends and family members were affected by cancer,” said Alexis Keith (12). “We just thought it was a good idea to raise money for them.”

 

Throughout Relay, there were many events that took place. Many of them were light-hearted, such as Zumba, Minute-

At Relay for Life, there were many activities throughout the event. During one lap, Seniors Shaelyn Kaiser, Olivia Harmon, Lindsay Ambrisco, Cass Martin, and Maggie Strawoet did Zumba.

to-Win-It, sending people to jail, and rounds were people born in each decade would take a lap. While there were fun events, there were also serious ones that led the focus to the real reason everyone was there: eliminating cancer.

 

The event opened with Mr. Doug Hoffman telling the crowd about his past experience with cancer, and his current experience. As the event continued, many people bought luminaries for their loved ones who have suffered or fallen to cancer. In the middle of the event, the Luminaria Ceremony began.

 

As the crowd stood in the dark, the speaker read a poem about cancer being like a birthday cake with twelve candles, each one representing a month that was spent without their loved one. As each month was read, a luminaria was lit. At the end of the speech, everyone was encouraged to go light their loved ones luminaria. After the room was lit up by the array of luminaries, the attendees took silent laps around the track in honor of all of the people afflicted by the deadly disease.

 

Relay inspired hope, but one of its purposes was to raise money to donate to cancer research. James Buchanan High School decided to raise money through a Mr. Relay Pageant, where the school’s boys went through comical pageant events.

 

“The pageant was our way to raise the money. We ended [up] raising a lot more than we expected to,” said Keith.

 

At the end of the Relay week, the pageant raised approximately $800 and the actual Relay for Life over $28,000, with donations still coming in, that was given to the American Cancer Society.

 

With many people being diagnosed and affected by cancer every day, our community took Relay for Life by the reigns and raised money to abolish the disease for once and for all.

Filed under Off Campus, Showcase

Taking a Closer Look at Prom 2018

This+year%27s+Prom+tickets+are+rubber+keychains+that+look+like+wood+to+represent+the+%22Enchanted+Gardens%22+theme.+
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Taking a Closer Look at Prom 2018

This year's Prom tickets are rubber keychains that look like wood to represent the

This year's Prom tickets are rubber keychains that look like wood to represent the "Enchanted Gardens" theme.

Madi Dorsey

This year's Prom tickets are rubber keychains that look like wood to represent the "Enchanted Gardens" theme.

Madi Dorsey

Madi Dorsey

This year's Prom tickets are rubber keychains that look like wood to represent the "Enchanted Gardens" theme.

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Junior Class Officers are preparing for one of the most PROMinent events of the year! Many aspects must be thought out to make the event go smoothly and successfully, ensuring everyone has a good time and a night they will remember forever.

 

This year’s Prom will take place on May 19 at Green Grove Gardens in Greencastle from 7-10 P.M. Tickets are now on sale through April 27 and prices are $35 for a single and $60 for a couple.

 

Officers Alyssa Blair (11), Chesney Carbaugh (11), Madi Dorsey (11), Shaelyn Kaiser (11), and Tori Hutchison (11), have always held meetings to agree on decisions for events and fundraising. As juniors this year, they will put together the Prom.

 

“We’ve been preparing since spring of last year so I feel like we’ve been doing a pretty good job at getting everything together,” said Kaiser.

 

A big aspect of prom is the theme. The theme is the story that decides what the decorations, food, tickets, and favors will look like.

 

“The theme is Enchanted Gardens and it’s going to be really pretty,” said Dorsey. “We’re going to have a lot of flowers and lights. We’re hoping that it turns out to look very enchanted.”

 

The officers spent a chunk of their time flipping through big prom magazines that companies send them filled with theme ideas. They all had to come to agree on a theme that would be fun and fit with the venue.

 

“We were actually thinking of a Starry Night theme,” said Kaiser. “But since Green Grove Gardens already has a nice garden theme on the outside, we thought it would correlate very well with the inside.”

 

A lot goes on when prepping for the big event. It is not all just simply picking and choosing. Officers must keep a budget, time, and what students will like while making decisions. They want to make the prom look nice but still keep tickets affordable so students want and are able to attend.

 

“It’s difficult to stay within the budget sometimes because we want certain things but the expense might be too large so we have to work around it,” said Kaiser. “We’re doing the best we can to keep the tickets cheaper because I know that was a complaint last year.”

 

With the help of the junior class doing multiple fundraisers since their freshman year, including Joe Corbi, Yankee Candle, Fisher’s Popcorn, and Krispy Kreme donuts, ticket expenses will be lower and more money can be added to the budget.  

 

“There’s a lot of stress that goes on behind the scenes. You have to talk to decorators, multiple decorators, so you can see who has the best price for what you want,” said Dorsey. “Also, you have to think about what you want and agree on it with your other officers and that’s kind of hard because we all have different tastes.”

 

Despite different tastes, the junior class officers met in the middle to decide on the best choices for an enjoyable prom that will be remembered by students for a lifetime.

Filed under On Campus

The Battle Between Textbooks and Technology: Who will Win?

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Back in the days when schools were different, students would use textbooks and pieces of paper from their notebook for their classwork. Some schools have started to lean toward technology, instead of using paper as classwork. At James Buchanan High School, there are many students that carry a laptop from class to class and not have to worry about carrying heavy textbooks home all the time because technology has improved over the years, the teaching style of some teachers altered.

 

“Most of what we do in class is online,” Ms. Nicole Myers (Faculty) said. “For most of our resources, I use Google Classroom to post assignments, I will use Actively Learn as one of our reading sources, and then Membean for all of our vocab.”

 

For Mr. Matthew Riegsecker (Faculty), he did not have to change his teaching style as much compared to Myers.

 

“We try to mix things up,” Riegsecker said. “The resources I use varies from the SmartBoard to their Chromebooks, to their textbooks, simulations, notes, projects, etc.”

 

Technology has improved over the years. Students use technology every single day, whether or not they are in school. Technology has been something that has adapted to everyday life, and now it has been implemented in schools.

 

“For one thing, technology is really quick,” Myers explained. “If I have one of those spur of the moment ideas, I do not have to run around and have it printed off and copied and stapled. I can push it out from Google Classroom through their Chromebooks.”

 

“I think that we have a district with a 1:1 initiative where students have Chromebooks. So we are expected to embrace that and also try to implement technology as much as we can,” Riegsecker said.

When classes are using technology, the textbooks tend to be out of sight. Some teachers like the idea of being able to find the textbooks online, while others think that having them in the classroom is still just as good.

 

“I have one book that I looked at my first year here. I use a couple of resources from it, but anything that’s in that book I can find online at this point,” Myers said. “I don’t like that much about textbooks at this point, but I will use the textbook if I run out of ideas.”

 

“The textbooks have a consistency in the information that is being presented to the students,” Riegsecker said. “We can all be on the same page as far as the content they are being delivered.”

The generation that kids are growing up in is different compared to the ways of their teachers. Students, on one hand, have a better understanding of what is going on and they have adapted to the way technology is used. Some students prefer having their classwork on paper, while others like the idea of having their classwork on their Chromebooks.

 

“I prefer the Chromebooks over the textbooks,” Danielle Barnhart (11) explains. “You have so much more information at your fingertips as opposed to carrying and lugging around like five textbooks.”

“I like textbooks because, especially for Math and History, whenever you are using them they are right there and you can flip the pages while you are doing your homework,” said Shaelyn Kaiser (11).  “I feel like our technology can kind of be unreliable.”

 

As students go from grade to grade, they will have other teachers that have either similar or different teaching styles to other teachers they have had in the past years. Because teachers don’t follow the same teaching styles, students start to adapt to the way teachers teach.

 

“I like most of the teaching styles,” Barnhart said. “I especially like the Ag classes because they are not exactly lecture style, but instead, they are more interactive.”

 

“I think that my favorite teaching style is lecturing,” Kaiser said.  “I like listening to things and I tend to listen by ear, which is the way I learn the best. I prefer everything to be physically in front of me because I always know that it [textbooks] is going to be there when I need it.”

 

Technology plays a role in formulating our future. In the late 1900s into early 2000s, technology was not nearly as complex as what it is now. During these years, teachers were starting to see the technology beginning to develop. When Myers was in college, she did not have the same technology students at James Buchanan have now. She was not taught how to use technology in her classes. It wasn’t until she started teaching at James Buchanan when she finally started to pick up on the idea of using technology within her classroom.

 

“Now I know more about technology and all that I do with it and I do not know how I would ever go backwards at this point,” Myers said. “Here, we have Chromebooks and we have this and we have that and I would eventually make it all work. I will never look back because it is way better.”

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