The Rocket Flame

Almost, Maine

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Almost, Maine

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This year’s fall production, Almost, Maine, is set in a place called Almost in Maine. It is technically not a town because that requires people to get together and organize it to become one. Since that never happened, it’s inhabitants just call it Almost.

Each scene was student-directed and the whole play featured several love stories that are all happening simultaneously.

“I think there were 8 in total,” said Ella Heckman (12).

Each of the scenes are completely independent of each other. They don’t necessarily happen chronologically and don’t rely on each other for the story to make sense. It’s just a collage of many stories.

“We all practiced in our own groups,” said Audra Hissong (10). “And then we had two rehearsals before the show to run through the whole thing.”

In one of the scenes, a bachelorette was having a party at a restaurant and ran into her ex- boyfriend. This particular story focused on a love that was, rather than one that will be or the formation of one.

“We each auditioned for our parts,” said Lillie Matiko (10). “I wanted my part.”

Another scene featured a man asking a woman to marry him, to which he got no response and the two drifted apart. After some time, she shows up at his doorstep with an answer.

“Ella and I said it was probably about 5-7 years,” said Connor Slemp (9) between the time that she was asked and the time she gave the answer.

He explains to her the pain that this would cause. The scene ends with a woman calling his name which would show that he’s with someone and possibly married.

“It was the first time I ever did something like that, but it turned out to be extremely fun and a good experience,” said Slemp.

The play’s debut was December 20 and 21 and was performed in the JB auditorium. It was only the third time ever performed as a whole since each scene was always individually rehearsed. Even with multiple directors and little time for whole run-throughs, it flowed smoothly and was enjoyed by the audience.

Something New for JB: Clash of Classes

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Something New for JB: Clash of Classes

The Spirit Stick is presented by Homecoming King Nick Alfree (12) and Homecoming Queen Ella Heckman (12) to Mr. Dickey (Faculty) to begin the festivities of Clash of Classes.

The Spirit Stick is presented by Homecoming King Nick Alfree (12) and Homecoming Queen Ella Heckman (12) to Mr. Dickey (Faculty) to begin the festivities of Clash of Classes.

The Spirit Stick is presented by Homecoming King Nick Alfree (12) and Homecoming Queen Ella Heckman (12) to Mr. Dickey (Faculty) to begin the festivities of Clash of Classes.

The Spirit Stick is presented by Homecoming King Nick Alfree (12) and Homecoming Queen Ella Heckman (12) to Mr. Dickey (Faculty) to begin the festivities of Clash of Classes.

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Tri-M Inductions

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Tri-M Inductions

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Tri- M Induction

Dancing Through the Decades

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Dancing Through the Decades

President of Student Council, Sarah Kimmel (12) paints a sign for spirit week.

President of Student Council, Sarah Kimmel (12) paints a sign for spirit week.

President of Student Council, Sarah Kimmel (12) paints a sign for spirit week.

President of Student Council, Sarah Kimmel (12) paints a sign for spirit week.

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Homecoming has been a tradition at James Buchanan High School for many years. For alumni, it’s a time to reminisce. The student body sees it as a time for dancing and pep rallies; however, for a small group of students it’s the busiest time of the year. The Student Council takes on a hefty workload behind the scenes to make sure this grand event runs smoothly. 

“We had a work day right after school ended last year to plan the dance,” said Bella Shupp (11), “We laid out all the details.” 

This year, Homecoming is much earlier than previous years. This put extra pressure on Student Council members to have everything ready on time. Students usually come to the dance and see the decorations, but don’t realize how much work and planning it requires. They had to book the DJ, make decorations, design t-shirts, and plan the pep rally. 

“We put up flyers and made a bulletin board to help spread the word to get participation,” said Timothy Helman (10). 

The theme is “Dancing Through the Decades.” To promote the theme, the bulletin board was decorated with records and retro fonts. For Spirit Week, each day was a different decade starting with the 50s and ending with the 90s. 

“We chose this theme because it is easy for people to participate,” said Helman.

Many people within the school own Converses, scrunchies, and many other things that were popular fashion trends in past decades. This makes it easy to show school spirit and participate throughout the week. The Student Council also wanted to boost school spirit even more; they plan to do this through the pep rally with fun games and songs. 

“The Homecoming candidates will be singing karaoke,” said Shupp, they will also be doing a fashion show with toilet paper.” 

The Homecoming King candidates this year are: Nick Alfree (12), Brady Bigler (12), Dean King (12), Grant Souder (12), and Jacob Troupe (12). The Homecoming Queen candidates are: Kaitlyn Ebersole (12), Lily Faust (12), Ella Heckman (12), Reilly Heinbaugh (12) and Hannah Kimmel (12). 

“All the seniors nominated candidates,” said Shupp. “Then the whole school is allowed to vote for the final King and Queen.”

Typically the football game is on a Friday night and the dance takes place the next day on a Saturday night, but this year the game and dance are all in the same day. Saturday at 1 PM the game starts. At halftime the King and Queen will be announced, then at 7 PM the dance begins. 

“I just hope that everyone has fun at Homecoming. It’s a time to relax and not worry about school,” said Shupp.  

At the end of last school year, members of Student Council congregated together to plan out next year’s Homecoming. Since then, Student Council has been implementing their ideas that were written down on paper into reality. 

 

Go See She Loves Me This Weekend!

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Go See She Loves Me This Weekend!

Emily Palmerchuck in She Loves Me

Emily Palmerchuck in She Loves Me

Hannah Zomak

Emily Palmerchuck in She Loves Me

Hannah Zomak

Hannah Zomak

Emily Palmerchuck in She Loves Me

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Ag Olympics Get Students and Faculty MOOving

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Ag Olympics Get Students and Faculty MOOving

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From blue and gold day to kissing cows, the FFA had a very eventful week. As the week went on with different dress up days they all led to the big event that everyone looked forward to: The Ag Olympics. This photo gallery gives and inside look of what happens when cows and hay bales are involved. Students and faculty participate in various events to test their strength and determination to beat the other teams. This (sometimes) friendly event gets the student body on their toes to see which teacher raised the most money and will kiss the cow and who will win the Ag Olympics.

Ready? Set? Race!

Who Will Cross the Finish Line First?

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Ready? Set? Race!

The teams race from the start line to see who will win the first event.

The teams race from the start line to see who will win the first event.

Sydney Jones

The teams race from the start line to see who will win the first event.

Sydney Jones

Sydney Jones

The teams race from the start line to see who will win the first event.

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Ready? Set? Go!  Yells Ella Heckman (10) and the teams race off to tackle their first event.  The intensity increases as one teammate after the other races against the other teams to get a point on the board.  Ag Olympics hosted by the Ag department is a favorite for many students each year.  FFA Weeks builds the excitement for the finale on Friday for only one week out of the entire school year.

During FFA Week there are spirit days that lead up to the Olympics.  This year the spirit days consisted of: Camo Day, America Day, Farmer Day, Farm Animal Day, and Blue and Gold Day.  Each day had different criteria based off the theme.  Camo Day you were encouraged to wear any and all camo that you owed.  For America Day wearing an sort of red, white, or blue was fantastic.  Farmer Day you were to dress like a farmer.  For Farm Animal Day you were encouraged to dress like any farm.  Finally, for Blue and Gold Day you could wear any assortment of blue and gold.

“FFA chapters use National FFA Week to share agriculture with their fellow students as well as their communities,” said Adrianna Durboraw (11).

Living in a rural community makes FFA Week so much more important.  This is a way to keep our community together through something the community is good at, farming, and something that everyone loves, fun.  

“We do Ag Olympics to have fun and get the whole school involved.  Everybody in the school gets to watch as teams participate in activities,” said Adrianna Durboraw, “ FFA week is to inform people about agriculture and FFA knowledge.”

This year there were six teams.The teams were Yearbook: Rachel Kimmel, Kirstyn Black, Macey Keefer, and Megan Rummel; The Dream Team: Shane Coursey, Heath Hissong, Cody Saunders, and David Clopper; The 717: Evan Clopper, Logan Miller, Trysten Hensley, and Caleb Wise; The Thrasher: Delanie Black, Madison Hock, Lacy Nolan, and Shayla Plantz; Brothers From Differ

ent Mothers: Moses Goetz, Logan Weaver, Alex Letterman, and Trey Settings; and finally The Teachers: Ms. Fox, Mrs. Swailes, Mrs. Chambers, and Mrs. Miller.  Anyone from the school can make a team and enter into the Olympics.  There is a limit of four people per team and everyone must participate in almost every activity. This year the games consisted of: Hay Bale Tossing, Corn Shucking, Apple Bobbing, Penny in a Haystack, and a Pie Eating Contest.  Each of these activities helps students that don’t have a farming background appreciate the community they live in and the work that they do.

“Agriculture is our wisest pursuit because it will, in the end, contribute most to real wealth, good morals, and happiness,” said Adrianna Durboraw.

The community we live in is full of new agricultural opportunities.  Being able to bring them to school for students to learn while having fun is a rare opportunity.

Want to Know How to Save a Life?

One donation saves three lives.

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Want to Know How to Save a Life?

Michael Newman has his arm in the air awaiting the final steps of the blood donation process.

Michael Newman has his arm in the air awaiting the final steps of the blood donation process.

Kirstyn Black

Michael Newman has his arm in the air awaiting the final steps of the blood donation process.

Kirstyn Black

Kirstyn Black

Michael Newman has his arm in the air awaiting the final steps of the blood donation process.

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It’s the morning of the first day you donate.  The doors open and a cold draft runs over your body and nerves take over.  As you scan the room you see students and teachers waiting in line to get blood drawn.  Friends lay on the Red Cross tables with arms in the air, while others wait for the process to begin.  Familiar voices fill the air as some have friends with them for support as the volunteers begin.

Possibly the scariest, but most rewarding donation to give.  Your blood.  Needles, tubes, bags, and

iodine in abundance on the stage of the James Buchanan High School on Thursday, Sept. 21 as a Red Cross blood drive was hosted by the JB FFA chapter in the auditorium last week.

The FFA motto seems to stand for many of the students and staff at the high school. “Learning to do, doing to learn, earning to live, living to serve,” said Ella Heckman, 10, FFA Reporter.

The exceptional turnout, yet again this year, has proven the servant-hearted community that surrounds the school.

When asked the question if Ms. Brittany May donated blood she said, “I give blood as often as I can. Thursday was actually my 15th donation!”

Items that are a must have to donate blood.

Each donation saves three lives.  Together the community helped save 69 lives on Thursday during the FFA’s first blood drive of three to be held this year.  The next blood drives will be in the winter and the spring.  

“It is quite rewarding to see students and teachers take time out of their busy schedules to help others in need,” said May.

The blood drive serves more than just one purpose.  There is a scholarship that the relies on the success of the blood drive.

“The scholarship is based on the number of units donated throughout the year,” says May, “We are already about halfway to our goal of units donated this year to reach the first tier of scholarships.”

If there are more than enough units donated for the first scholarship, there could potentially be two.  This scholarship is offered to any senior that is currently active in the Community Service Committee, which is the committee that offers the scholarship.

“FFA is full of amazing opportunities to help people. The blood drive is so easy and rewarding because all it takes is a pint of blood to save somebody’s life!” said Heckman.

The James Buchanan High School FFA chapter prides themselves as being community based and willing to serve.  The annual blood drive is a great way to keep that reputation alive.

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