The Rocket Flame

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Science Days

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Science Days

The ap chemistry class poses for a picture on the playground at St. Thomas Elementary. Carlee Jackson (11), Tanner Myers (11), Jordan Harbold (11), Alyssa Blair (12), Daniel Corcoran (12), Trenton Morgan (12), Amanda Sensinger (11), Dale MIller (12), Mackenzie Saunders (11), Alyssa Velasquez-Glant (12), Kayla Noll-Bader (12), Ella Jones (12), and Abby Carbaugh (12)

The ap chemistry class poses for a picture on the playground at St. Thomas Elementary. Carlee Jackson (11), Tanner Myers (11), Jordan Harbold (11), Alyssa Blair (12), Daniel Corcoran (12), Trenton Morgan (12), Amanda Sensinger (11), Dale MIller (12), Mackenzie Saunders (11), Alyssa Velasquez-Glant (12), Kayla Noll-Bader (12), Ella Jones (12), and Abby Carbaugh (12)

The ap chemistry class poses for a picture on the playground at St. Thomas Elementary. Carlee Jackson (11), Tanner Myers (11), Jordan Harbold (11), Alyssa Blair (12), Daniel Corcoran (12), Trenton Morgan (12), Amanda Sensinger (11), Dale MIller (12), Mackenzie Saunders (11), Alyssa Velasquez-Glant (12), Kayla Noll-Bader (12), Ella Jones (12), and Abby Carbaugh (12)

The ap chemistry class poses for a picture on the playground at St. Thomas Elementary. Carlee Jackson (11), Tanner Myers (11), Jordan Harbold (11), Alyssa Blair (12), Daniel Corcoran (12), Trenton Morgan (12), Amanda Sensinger (11), Dale MIller (12), Mackenzie Saunders (11), Alyssa Velasquez-Glant (12), Kayla Noll-Bader (12), Ella Jones (12), and Abby Carbaugh (12)

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The ap chemistry class poses for a picture on the playground at St. Thomas Elementary. Carlee Jackson (11), Tanner Myers (11), Jordan Harbold (11), Alyssa Blair (12), Daniel Corcoran (12), Trenton Morgan (12), Amanda Sensinger (11), Dale Miller (12), Mackenzie Saunders (11), Alyssa Velasquez-Glant (12), Kayla Noll-Bader (12), Ella Jones (12), and Abby Carbaugh (12)

On May 16 and 17, The AP Chemistry class at James Buchanan High School went to TSD Elementary schools for a Science Days.  During Science Days, the Chem class walked the elementary students through two experiments to get them excited about science.  After the experiments JBHS students related what they did to a real-life problem and showed how scientists solve problems. On Thursday the students went to St. Thomas and Mt. View and on Friday they went to Mercersburg and Montgomery.  

The project was first introduced by the high schools Chemistry teacher, Mrs. Rebecca Miller (Faculty).  She has been taking her AP Chemistry classes to the elementary schools for a little over ten years.

“I think we had a very successful day,”  said Noah Wise (12). “My favorite part was how excited all the little kids got when learning about science.”

Miller got the experiment ideas this year from the teacher’s science convention. During the Toothpaste Challenge, the students had to empty out a bottle of toothpaste and used their problem solving skills to see how much they could get back into the bottle.  

Hunter Gayman (2) and Chloe Shew (2) work together to get toothpaste back into the bottle during Elementary Science Day.

“The toothpaste lab was my favorite to do with the children because it was fun to see them use their imagination to come up with different ideas to get the toothpaste back into the bottle,” said Daniel Corcoran (12).

This was supposed to replicate when scientists have to quickly clean-up spills that can be harmful to the earth, people, or animals.  

The Copycat Challenge was used to show students how scientist are copycats sometimes when it comes to making new inventions.  An example given to the kids was how scientists got the idea of airplanes from animals like birds, butterflies, and bees.

“The copycat lab was my favorite to do with the kids because we had to remember the color wheel and experiment which colors would  show a desired color,” said Owen Stoner (12).

The challenge consisted of the children mixing different food coloring colors to mimic the color of soda.

Colton Pine (2) and Trey Shandle (2) work together to complete the Copycat Challenge on Elementary Science Day.

After the experiments were complete, the students had time to discuss how they were related to science.  They also had the opportunity to ask the high school students any questions they had about high school.

“It was really fun when the students asked us about high school,” said Corcoran. “We were asked questions from “ Is the lunch at the high school good?” to “ What are your plans after high school?”

In the future, Miller has hopes of expanding and continuing the project. Whether it be going to more grade levels or going to the middle school too.  The elementary science days have an impact on the younger kids and can be very memorable throughout the kids educational career.

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14 Things To Get Your Mom For Mother’s Day

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14 Things To Get Your Mom For Mother’s Day

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All throughout your life, your mother has been there to clean your dirty dishes, put away your laundry, and cook up meals for your rumbling stomach. From your perspective, these tasks may just look small and like they do not take a lot of time, but little do you know, these tasks are just small pieces of a bigger puzzle. In reality, mothers do many things for the well being of their children and on a Sunday in every May, we celebrate and appreciate their time and effort. This year, Mother’s Day falls on May 11.

 

Most of the time, acts of appreciation that mothers desire are small, but they want to know that their children truly love and appreciate the things they do for them.

 

“On Mother’s Day, honestly, I just want to be with the kids and spend the day enjoying them, not having to worry about cooking or any of that,” said Mrs. Stacey Deiseroth (Faculty).

 

If you are stuck on what to get your mom for Mother’s Day, here are 14 simple gifts to show how much you love her.

 

At the end of the day, all moms just simply want to be appreciated and loved for all the things they do for their families even if it is just for one day. Getting your mother any of these gifts will certainly be the height of her Mother’s Day.

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Rockets Catching the Dub for School Spirit

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Rockets Catching the Dub for School Spirit

Cass Martin (12) and Hannah Kimmel (11) lip sync their portion of the Lip Dub project as Austin Thomas (10) films and Mr. Kevin Gustafson (Faculty) carries a speaker with the music.

Cass Martin (12) and Hannah Kimmel (11) lip sync their portion of the Lip Dub project as Austin Thomas (10) films and Mr. Kevin Gustafson (Faculty) carries a speaker with the music.

Emma Gipe

Cass Martin (12) and Hannah Kimmel (11) lip sync their portion of the Lip Dub project as Austin Thomas (10) films and Mr. Kevin Gustafson (Faculty) carries a speaker with the music.

Emma Gipe

Emma Gipe

Cass Martin (12) and Hannah Kimmel (11) lip sync their portion of the Lip Dub project as Austin Thomas (10) films and Mr. Kevin Gustafson (Faculty) carries a speaker with the music.

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On Tuesday May 7 the faculty and students at James Buchanan High School showed what being a Rocket is all about during their morning activity period.  Students in Mr. Kevin Gustafson’s (Faculty) Sports and Entertainment Marketing classes planned a Lip Dub in which the whole school participated. Every club, sports team, student and faculty member were shown off in the lip-syncing video.

Students in the class stayed after school Monday to decorated the halls with balloons, streamers, and posters sporting our school colors and cheering on the Rockets to show off during the video. Also, most students wore green and white to show school spirit, representing their various organizations.

“Coach G had the idea last year and showed us a couple of different schools doing lip dubs, which made us decide to plan our own,” said Madison Bailey (11).

The Lip Dub project showcased clubs like National Honors Society, Foreign Exchange Club, Work Co-Op, and sports like Football, Softball, Baseball, and Boys’ and Girls’ Tennis. 

Many people helped plan the Lip dub to make it run as smoothly as possible. Each club or sport was assigned to an area in the hallway. As a mashup of popular songs played over the loudspeaker of the school, students from Gustafson’s class filmed each club and sports team.

“We had to first start with songs,” said Bailey. “Considering what songs were the most popular and unblocked from the United States on YouTube.”

A map of where the clubs and sports teams were supposed to stand helped keep everything organized. A designated singer was assigned to certain areas in the school that walked through as each song played.

Kelley Reeder
Austin Thomas (10) and Mr. Kevin Gustafson (Faculty) pose for a photo after the third run of the Lip Dub Project on Tuesday. Austin was behind the camera and Mr. Gustafson had a speaker to play the music.

“Most of the student body was involved,” said Trenton Bradley (12). “We welcomed all clubs and sports teams to participate and we trusted them with the freedom to do their own act.”

There was even an activity period where everyone spent time practicing for the Lip Dub to work out some small kinks before the actual video was filmed.

“We even timed all the different switches between hallways and turns and began to place clubs in their different areas on the map,” said Bailey.

 

After all the clubs and sports were featured in the Lip Dub, everyone sprinted to the gym for a miniature pep rally where teachers and students did the wave and cheered. The drum line also pepped up the crowd for the video while the basketball team dunked to show our school spirit as a grand finale in the Lip Dub.

The Sports and Entertainment Marketing Class is now working on the editing process. They have to put all the clips together and add the music to make the final product.

“Expect to see the Lip Dub within the following weeks of filming,” said Bradley. “Definitely before the end of the 2019 school year.”

When the finished product of the Lip Dub project arrives, the James Buchanan student body will see all the work, planning and editing put in to make this happen.

“It was a lot, but between the two Sports and Entertainment Marketing classes and students, it became a huge success,” said Bailey.

 

 

2019 Special Olympics

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2019 Special Olympics

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On May 1 2019, the James Buchanan High school hosted their own Special Olympics. Taking place at the rocket stadium, schools in the Tuscarora school district bussed their kids to the stadium early Wednesday morning.  With a total of 42 participants; 19 high school participants, 9 Middle School, and 14 elementary school students. Each student competed at 3 events; softball throw, track race, and the long jump. Each school was put into different teams which competed against each other in the different events. Every participant was given 3 tries to get a better distance/score, when the participant finished they were given a popsicle stick telling them what place they received. All the students were happy as they showed off their multiple ribbons to the volunteers as well as their own parents who were welcome to attend the event. The day was filled with lots of cheering and encouragement as students had a chance to come out of their shell and express themselves.

Roses Are Red, Violets Are Blue, I’d Like To Go To Prom With You

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Roses Are Red, Violets Are Blue, I’d Like To Go To Prom With You

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What do marriages and proms have in common? Proposals! Or rather, “promposals” for high school juniors and seniors.

Writing out your ideas can help you eliminate ones you don’t like as much.

Couples and friends use promposals to ask each other to prom. If you don’t have your prom date yet, here are a few tips from students that have already “promposed” to their dates.

“To plan my promposal, I just sort of talked to my friends,” said Dylan Poffenberger (11). “I asked them what they thought I should do.”

Dylan Poffenberger (11) uses a letter to ask Allison Collings (12) to prom.

It doesn’t have to be just up to you. Use other friends as a resource to help come up with ideas. When brainstorming a way to ask his date to prom, Poffenberger and his friends came up with a promposal using the song “Please, Mr. Postman” by the Marvelettes.

“I used a satchel,” Poffenberger said, acting as the postman who brought a letter that asked his date to prom. “I had to borrow it from one of my friends.”

In addition to asking friends for ideas, it pays to ask friends to help with the promposal itself. Poffenberger borrowed a mail satchel from a friend, and Jackie Wagaman (12) got some help from the clarinet section when she asked Michael Newman (12) to prom.

“Michael hinted that we should go to prom together, but the elephant in the room was the promposal,” said Wagaman. “So, being the non-traditional lady that I am, I promposed to him, because I’m a giving person and I like planning things like that for my friends.”

Wagaman gifted Newman a bag of coffee in the promposal, as she knew that Newman liked to drink coffee. Poffenberger knew that his date, Allison Collings (12), also liked cuties oranges, so he got her a bag to go along with his promposal.

Ashley Alfree (9), Kennedy Sauders (9), Sadie Garbinski (9), and Hailey Embree (10) spell out “Prom” for Jackie Wagaman (12) as she asks Michael Newman (12) to prom.

“Make sure that [your promposal] is cute and the person that you’re asking will like it,” Poffenberger said.

Making sure that your date will like their promposal is one of the most important parts, as well as making sure that it’s sincere. Poffenberger also advised having the promposal be something that’s special to the person that you’re asking. The promposal doesn’t have to be one that’s in the middle of the cafeteria during lunch, with balloons and posters. It can be simple and straightforward, as simple as just writing “prom?” on a cup of coffee.

“Sometimes, less is best,” Wagaman said. “Focus on the moment and the person.”

Wagaman also said that by making the moment special and memorable for your date, it will make it memorable for you in turn.

Nick Alfree (11) utilizes a flag to ask his date to prom at the Indoor Color Guard championships.

“I would say just make sure you think about it, but don’t think about it too much,” said Poffenberger.

The basic tips of planning a promposal? Brainstorm with your friends; put your heads together because you’ll be bound to get an idea that works. Make sure that it’s special and memorable for the person you want to ask, and then it’ll be special for you as well. Prompose to them in a way that they’ll appreciate. You don’t want to embarrass them by having a large, public promposal planned if they’d rather have something small and quiet. Finally, don’t stress if it doesn’t turn out perfect; it’s the little quirks and flaws that make moments memorable.

 

James Buchanan Indoor Guard

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James Buchanan Indoor Guard

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James Buchanan Indoor Guard

 

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Class of 2023, This is For You

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Class of 2023, This is For You

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The school board at Tuscarora School District has implemented two new graduation requirements into the curriculum for the incoming freshmen of next year, for the Class of 2023. The two classes are titled Personal Finance and State & Local Government/Community History. The teachers in the departments of these classes have shown excitement about including these new required courses. They are anxious to see growth in the students taking the classes since they believe they will see a positive impact from them.

 

The State & Local Government/Community History class being introduced will become part of the required curriculum for the Social Studies department. One advocate for this new class is Mrs. Megan Swailes (Faculty) who is a ninth grade American History teacher. She feels that students should be more aware of the government and history around them that they may not even see and believes that this course will be beneficial towards that.

 

“It’s just to educate the kids on how the local setting is set up and hopefully kind of push them to where they could get involved,” said Swailes.  “Then the history part of it is just acknowledging that you live in a pretty historically-rich area.”

 

The department feels that this class will play a more vital role in the students’ academic career rather than federal government, which most students rarely get involved in throughout their lives. The teachers feel it will motivate the students to get involved in the community that is around them which they have easier access to.

 

“You take federal government but there is not a lot of time for the state and local and that level of government is what people tend to get more involved with,” said Swailes. “That’s the government that we feel we really need to emphasize for kids.”

 

The Personal Finance course has been offered as an option for previous classes but is now being introduced as a requirement for the Class of 2023. This course teaches financial skills such as paying taxes, cashing checks, and preparing for retirement that are very important for adulthood. The department teaching this course hopes students take something positive away from it.

 

“I hope that they learn something that maybe their parents didn’t teach them and that they can use it in life to further their finances and their savings,” said Mrs. Linda Rife (Faculty).

 

With these skills being so essential for adulthood, it is hard to see why a student would not want to take this course to prepare for their life after graduation. Different faculty members at James Buchanan are supporters of the Personal Finance course and feel that it would be helpful to the students.

 

“One of the things people struggle with the most is money, so teaching people how to be prepared financially for after high school I think is just very vital,” said Mrs. Lynn Troutman (Faculty).

 

The rationale behind adding these courses is very simple: both are proven to be very vital for after high school and will give you skills and knowledge that you may not often get the opportunity to learn. The staff hopes to see great things come from the students after taking these graduation requirements.  

Singing, Dancing, and Vanilla Ice Cream – Oh My!

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Singing, Dancing, and Vanilla Ice Cream – Oh My!

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She Loves Me
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Inventing the Future: One Mouse Caddy at a Time

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Inventing the Future: One Mouse Caddy at a Time

Maggie Strawoet (12) and Jade Wolfe (11) stand by their table presenting their invention at one of the competitions.

Maggie Strawoet (12) and Jade Wolfe (11) stand by their table presenting their invention at one of the competitions.

Erin Martin

Maggie Strawoet (12) and Jade Wolfe (11) stand by their table presenting their invention at one of the competitions.

Erin Martin

Erin Martin

Maggie Strawoet (12) and Jade Wolfe (11) stand by their table presenting their invention at one of the competitions.

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Students from Mrs. Erin Martin’s (Faculty) classes have put their brains together to hatch up a plan for an invention. They will then compete in a competition for entrepreneurship and inventions. During these competitions, many different ideas and inventions are competed for a prize. The “Mouse Caddy” has gotten Jade Wolfe (11) and Maggie Strawoet (12) through many rounds of judges and more to come.

 

“We created the Mouse Caddy, which is a device that attaches to the backside of your laptop screen to hold your cordless mouse,” said Strawoet.

 

Their invention has been exhibited at a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) Competition in New Oxford, PA. Also, Wolfe and Strawoet put together a business plan which explains its purpose and expenses of the Mouse Caddy. The business plan has gotten through the first step at Lock Haven and will be sent higher up to state-level.

 

“We started brainstorming idea for our product and beginning the planning period around the end of September,” said Wolfe. “We really started to focus on designing and building since November and have continued to work on it since then.”

 

The work that goes into this project reflects the students’ creativity and how to make their ideas come to life. Students had to not only invent their creation but also formally express it and put it into words.

 

“We have created 2 display boards, a PowerPoint, a video or commercial, and a 1,000 word paper,” said Strawoet. “We also created multiple prototypes of our Mouse Caddy out of silicon, thermoplastic, and a 3D printer.”

 

Erin Martin

 

A panel of judges then grades the invention which determines if it advances on to the next level in any of the competitions.

 

“It depends on what competition it is, but usually the judges grade us off of some type of rubric,” said Wolfe.

 

On top of impressing the judges, they also face the competition from students from other schools that compete with their inventions. It gives them a chance to see what they are competing against, and what other cool inventions are being created.

 

“My favorite I’ve seen would have to be this magic mirror a group did,” said Strawoet. “It was basically a smart mirror because it had the time and the weather and all these cool features.”

 

Putting their heads together has helped them improve and continue to get better as they attend more and more competitions to compete with their inventions.

 

“Jade and I also have been able to work very well as a team. We know our deadlines and when things need to get done, we get it done,” said Strawoet. “We have worked well together throughout these competitions. We know each other’s strengths and weaknesses and that is something that will help us win these competitions.”

 

By using their skills to work together and successfully present their ideas to judges, these competitions have given the students plenty of opportunities to open up and get out of their comfort zone.

 

“I’ve really learned public speaking and also problem solving,” said Wolfe.

All the way since September, Strawoet and Wolfe have perfected their prototypes and ideas, but what is the end result? What is in it for them?

 

“Prizes depend on the competition we’re going to. Some are Amazon gift cards, and some are just money,” said Strawoet. “Normally there is some type of trophy or plaque”.

 

Wolfe and Strawoet are using their skills to continue competing in various other competitions. On March 28 and 29, Wolfe and Strawoet travel to Bloomsburg and then the State College.

 

They also have the opportunity to go to Harrisburg to the State Capitol where they will just present their products and try to sell them. Wolfe and Strawoet will continue to compete with the Mouse Caddy at many other competitions in the future.

 

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A Winter Wonderland

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A Winter Wonderland

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On Saturday, Feb. 9 James Buchanan hosted their annual Winter Dance from 7 to 10 p.m. Student Council is the organization responsible for the event, they also organize and plan all the other dances throughout the year. This year, they combined the Winter Dance and the Valentine’s Day Dance with a theme of Winter Wonderland.

“My favorite part about the dance is the theme,” said Taylor Piper (10).

With the theme being Winter Wonderland, Student Council hung light decorations and backdrops with a Winter theme, They also incorporated Valentine’s Day into it as well, using roses and hearts decorations.

“I think Student Council enjoys having fun and being together while they’re working together,” said Mrs. Ann Fitz (Faculty).

Student Council starts preparing for the dance early that morning at 9 a.m. until the students start crowding in that night.

With Student Council being responsible for the dance, it makes them accountable for things like the decorations, selling tickets, the DJ, and making sure there is student participation

“It gives the student body a wholesome opportunity to be together and have fun outside of school hours,” says Fitz.

SInging, Taylor Piper (10), Brianna Cole (10), and Breanna Dukehart (11) lead the crowd

While the participation isn’t as teeming with students like Homecoming or Prom, it is a dance for students to come and enjoy the night together.

The dance started at 7 p.m. and as the doors opened, students created a very prolonged line to enter the cafeteria, where the dance occurred. After a little while, all of the students in various grades were found dancing together in the middle of the floor.

The DJ also included himself in the night with interacting with the students. He picked out a handful of kids and gave them props to play a little game while dancing with everyone. Continuously talking to the student body trying to get them more rowdied up.

While dancing, students gather for a quick picture.

Many students seemed to enjoy the dance and all the people in it. It was a night for everyone to get dressed up and come together for an event.

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Circle Up to Gamify: English class takes on Classcraft

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Circle Up to Gamify: English class takes on Classcraft

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English 10 teachers Ms. Kelley Reeder and Ms. Nicole Myers explore the world of gamification in their Keystone English class to spice up the literature circle unit and bring some engagement and competition in for their students.

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Coding vs. Programming: What’s The Difference?

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Coding vs. Programming: What’s The Difference?

Showing him something on the computer, Mr. Brooks (Faculty) teaches Ty Robinson (10) a new concept.

Showing him something on the computer, Mr. Brooks (Faculty) teaches Ty Robinson (10) a new concept.

Showing him something on the computer, Mr. Brooks (Faculty) teaches Ty Robinson (10) a new concept.

Showing him something on the computer, Mr. Brooks (Faculty) teaches Ty Robinson (10) a new concept.

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The two computer terms, coding and programming, are words that we often use interchangeably without giving it much thought. Yes, they are correlated with each other but we rarely dive in deep to what each individual word truly means. Simple tasks such as setting your alarm clock, changing the radio station, or pressing the buttons on a microwave could lead to something even bigger in the immense world of technology. Writing code is only the start of creating software, and programming is where the process becomes extremely complex.

    

    The action of writing code is simply telling the computer what to do and how to function. Programming is putting all that information together and putting it to use.

 

    “Coding would be writing individual lines of information on a computer,” said Mr. Bill Brooks (Faculty), “and when it’s all compiled together, it creates one large program.”

 

   Although they sound similar, the jobs of coders and programmers are two vastly different things. The job of a coder is at a much more intermediate level than that of a programmer. It involves writing singular lines of code, while translating the computer language to the language you and I speak.

 

    “When you are coding, you are truly writing the code that maybe the everyday person wouldn’t understand,” said Mrs. Erin Martin (Faculty).

 

As for the job of the programmer, it requires a more advanced skillset. A programmer makes sure a machine or application runs efficiently without any mistakes. Making sure there are no errors is crucial to the machine correctly running as one large program. Making an error can ruin all of the computer coding that has already been done. The coding has to already be complete so that the programmer’s job can begin.

 

    “Before the programming can be done, somebody had to code it kind of in the background,” said Martin.

Working hard, Joshua Frey (10) sets up a code for his program.

    At James Buchanan High School, there is a computer science class offered that is taught by Brooks. During class, his students learn about the basic outline of coding and put it into practice. Brooks then teaches his students about compiling the codes together to make one large program. This program, if done correctly, would allow a machine to work effectively.

 

    “We write a lot of codes to make the program run correctly,” said Brooks talking about what activities happen daily, in his computer science class.

 

    Striving for greatness, the teachers in the technology education department hope to see a dramatic advance in the computer knowledge of students. As time passes, they feel that the coding and programming that is usually done behind the scenes, will start to be done by the consumers themselves.

 

    “Just like, years ago, we used to hire people to do typing. Now everybody does their own typing,” said Brooks, “Presently, we hire people to code, but in the future, people are going to start writing their own codes to make programs do what they want for their unique application.”

 

    If you have ever heard of the two terms, the line between coding and programming has always been blurred by assumption that they mean the same thing. The teachers of the technology education department, Mr. Brooks and Mrs. Martin, have been trying to teach their students the vast difference so that they may be able to do it on their own someday. They hope for the computer-based knowledge in the teenagers they teach to expand greatly as they learn more and more concepts.

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